Taaldag 2021

Vrijdag 22 oktober 2021, Vrije Universiteit Brussel

Zoals elk jaar organiseert de BKL (Belgische Kring voor Linguïstiek) een Taaldag. Dit jaar zal dit evenement plaatsvinden op vrijdag 22 oktober 2021 aan de faculteit Letteren en Wijsbegeerte van de Vrije Universiteit Brussel.

Call for papers

Lezingen (20’ presentatie + 10’ discussie) mogen gaan over elk mogelijk taalkundig onderwerp en kunnen worden gepresenteerd in een van de drie landstalen (Nederlands, Frans, Duits) of in het Engels. Abstracts (max. 500 woorden, exclusief referenties) vermelden duidelijk het onderwerp, de doelstellingen, de gebruikte data en methode en de (voorlopige) resultaten. De abstracts (met vermelding van naam en affiliatie van de auteurs) dienen ten laatste op woensdag 30 juni 2021 te worden ingezonden via EasyChair. U krijgt begin september antwoord van ons of uw abstract al dan niet aanvaard werd voor het congres.

Plaats

Alle activiteiten (lezingen en lunch) gaan door op de campus Etterbeek van de Vrije Universiteit Brussel aan de Pleinlaan 2 in Elsene. De campus ligt op wandelafstand van het station Etterbeek en de metrohalte Pétillon.
Nota bene: Als de gezondheidssituatie het onmogelijk maakt om de Taaldag op de campus te organiseren, zal de studiedag in online format georganiseerd worden.

Deelname

Deelname aan de Taaldag is gratis, zowel voor leden, als niet-leden. Wie een lezing wil geven, moet echter wel lid zijn bij het indienen van een abstract. Om lid te worden vult u het ledenformulier in op de BKL-website en betaalt u het lidgeld: € 40 voor wie het laatste nummer van het Belgian Journal of Linguistics wil ontvangen, € 20 voor inschrijving zonder exemplaar van het tijdschrift.

Prijs beste presentatie

Ook dit jaar zal het organisatieteam een prijs uitreiken voor de beste presentatie door een doctoraatsstudent. Wie hieraan wenst deel te nemen dient dat expliciet te vermelden in het abstract.

Belangrijke data

  • 30 juni 2021: deadline abstracts
  • begin september 2021: bevestiging aanvaarding abstracts
  • 22 oktober 2021: Taaldag

Namens de organisatie
Thomas Hoelbeek
Laura Rosseel

International Workshop on the Expression of Contrast and the Annotation of Information Structure in Corpora

18-19 November 2021 
Location: Online or hybrid (in Leuven + streaming), Belgium 

The aim of this workshop is to bring together researchers working on the encoding and analysis of information-structural concepts, and particularly contrast, in naturally attested data. 

In the last decades, quite some attention has gone to the concept of contrast in research on information structure. There is an ongoing discussion about the role of contrast in the conceptual framework: while most linguists consider contrast to be compatible with both focus and topic, creating the subtypes contrastive focus and contrastive topic (Repp & Cook 2010; Repp 2010, 2016; Büring 2016; Cruschina 2021b), some have argued that contrast is an autonomous information-structural category (Vallduví & Vilkuna 1998; Molnár 2002). A lot of researchers study the interaction of contrast with other domains of language, in particular syntax (Repp 2009; Lahousse et al. 2014; Cruschina & Remberger 2017; Cruschina 2021a) and prosody (Brunetti et al. 2010; Brunetti et al. 2012; Repp & Drenhaus 2015; Riester et al. 2020; Seeliger & Repp 2020). Moreover, contrast has been shown to be encoded by different linguistic means, such as contrastive adverbials (e.g. Csűry 2001; Hamma & Haillet 2002; Dupont 2019; Harthan 2019; Brysbaert & Lahousse 2020), and clefts (e.g. Hedberg 1990; Davidse 2000; Scappini 2013; Destruel & Velleman 2014; Lahousse & Borremans 2014; Lahousse et al. 2014; Bourgoin 2017). 

From a methodological point of view, this workshop mainly focuses on the identification of information-structural concepts (such as contrast) in naturally attested language. The annotation of these concepts in corpora of spontaneous speech is not straightforward (Ritz et al. 2008; Cook & Bildhauer 2011, 2013) and the concept of contrast proves to be particularly difficult in this respect, because it can be superposed on both topics and foci, and can be marked by various prosodic, syntactic and lexical means. Although a few initiatives have recently been taken to develop annotation guidelines for information structure (Götze et al. 2007; Brunetti et al. 2016; De Kuthy et al. 2018; Riester et al. 2018), there is no consensus on the “best practice”.

Call for Papers: 

The questions addressed in this workshop include (but are not limited to): 
– How can the concept of contrast be defined? 
– What is the link between contrast and other concepts of information structure (topic and focus)? How can we deal with “overlaps” between or “combinations” of information-structural concepts? 
– How does contrast interact with syntax / prosody / lexicon / etc. ? 
– How is contrast encoded in spontaneous language in different languages? Which prosodic / syntactic / lexical means are used to mark contrast? 
– Which information-structural concepts are particularly challenging to annotate in corpora, and may lead to poor inter-annotator agreement? 
– Are the existing annotation methods cross-linguistically applicable? Are there differences between text types, discursive genres, …? 
– How is contrast controlled for in experiments? How can this feed into corpus research? 

Submission guidelines: 
– Abstracts are invited for 30-minute presentations plus 10 minutes for discussion. 
– Abstracts should be anonymous and no longer than two pages (including references, examples, tables and figures), in Times New Roman font size 12, with margins of at least 2.5 cm (1 inch). 
– Abstracts should be written in English. 
– Submissions are limited to a maximum of two per author (with at most one single-authored paper). 
– Abstracts should be submitted in PDF format through EasyChair by 20 August 2021: https://easychair.org/conferences/?conf=contrastannotationis

Important dates: 
– 20 August 2021: deadline for abstract submission 
– 20 September 2021: notification of acceptance 
– 20 October 2021: deadline for registration 
– 18-19 November 2021: workshop (fully online or hybrid (in Leuven + streaming), in line with the sanitary restrictions at that moment)

PLIN Day 2021: Linguistics applied to Business Language in a multilingual and multicultural world

2021 PLIN Day, Friday May 7h, Université catholique de Louvain (Belgium) and/or online (depending on the COVID19-related situation and measures)

CALL for short papers – Deadline extended until 15 February 2021

The PLIN Day is an annual one-day thematic conference hosted by the Linguistics Research Unit of the Université catholique de Louvain (Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium). The conference has established itself over the years as an international forum for the exchange of ideas among scholars and has brought together researchers from all over the world.

The 2021 PLIN Day will take place on Friday, May 7th and is devoted to “Linguistics applied to Business Language in a multilingual and multicultural world”. It offers academics, professionals, undergraduate and postgraduate students an excellent opportunity to access, share and discuss cutting-edge research in the field. The following (non-exhaustive) list of themes will be covered this year:

  • The use of (corpus) linguistic methods in the study of organizational communication and/or the characteristics of business language
  • Research on techniques and practices for clear and simple communication within organizations. This includes techniques for simplifying documents issued by organizations in order to enhance accessibility.
  • The challenges of the use of “English as a lingua franca” in organizational communication and, more generally, of communication in English between native and non-native speakers within organizations.
  • Intercultural communication in multilingual business communication

The core of the conference will consist in keynote sessions but participants will also have the opportunity to present their most recent research and/or work in progress during a ‘short papers’ session.

Keynote speakers

Isabelle Clerc, Université de Laval
Thierry Fontenelle, European Investment Bank
Michael Handford, Cardiff University
Geert Jacobs, Universiteit Gent

CALL for short papers

In addition to the keynote sessions, a ‘short papers’ session will be organized to enable participants to present their most recent research and/or work in progress. We invite abstracts (between 300 and 500 words) addressing topics such as:

  • (Corpus) linguistic methods applied to the study of organizational communication
  • Analyses of functional and formal characteristics of business language
    • Clear and simple (written or oral) communication within organizations
    • “English as a lingua franca” in organizational communication
    • Communication in English between native and non-native speakers within organizations
    • Intercultural communication in multilingual business communication

We welcome contributions about languages other than Dutch, English, French, German, Italian and Spanish.

The short papers will be presented in English (10-minute presentation + 5 minutes for questions).

Abstract submissions (in English, between 300 and 500 words) should be sent by 15 February 2021 to the following address: plindayucl@uclouvain.be. Abstracts submitted as an attached document need to be anonymized (the name/s of the author/s should feature in the email message).

Acceptance for short papers will be notified by 15 March 2021.

For more informationhttps://uclouvain.be/fr/instituts-recherche/ilc/plin/plinday2021.html 

Important dates

15 February 2021: New deadline for abstract submissions
1 March, 2021: Registration opens
15 March 2021: Notification of acceptance for a short paper presentation
7 May, 2021: PLINDay 2021

Organizing committee

Sylvie De Cock, Université catholique de Louvain 
Thomas François, Université catholique de Louvain
Philippe Hiligsmann, Université catholique de Louvain
Adeline Müller, Université catholique de Louvain
Tran Hanh Trang Pham, Université catholique de Louvain
Laura Penha-Marion, Université catholique de Louvain

Scientific committee

Andrea Catellani, Université catholique de Louvain
Isabelle Clerc, Université de Laval
Sylvie De Cock, Université catholique de Louvain 
Amandine Dumont, Université catholique de Louvain
Thierry Fontenelle, European Investment Bank
Thomas François, Université catholique de Louvain
Michael Handford, Cardiff University
Philippe Hiligsmann, Université catholique de Louvain
Geert Jacobs, Universiteit Gent
Adeline Müller, Université catholique de Louvain
Sandrine Roginsky, Université catholique de Louvain
Lieve Vangehuchten, Universiteit Antwerpen

International Conference on Conversation Analysis and Psychotherapy

The International Conference on Conversation Analysis and Psychotherapy has been established as an international forum for building and developing research on psychotherapy from a conversation analytic perspective. In 2021, the focus of the conference will be the psychotherapy relationship.

Interest in the relationship between therapist and client has been central from the earliest days of psychotherapy. There is much agreement that the therapeutic relationship bears a significant relation to treatment outcome; it can help make therapy effective and provide a healing context for change. Most of the research on the therapy relationship to date has used quantitative methods drawn from clients, therapists or observers’ appraisal (e.g., based on questionnaires or checklist type measures). Much less energy has been committed to the detailed examination of the specifics of in-therapy events and how that may develop our qualitative understanding of how a therapy relationship is achieved through therapists’ and clients’ talk and conduct.

Conversation Analysis (CA), which examines the moment-by-moment sequential organization of social interaction in everyday and institutional contexts, has provided many insights into our understanding of how important psychotherapeutic ‘business’ is accomplished. This includes the psychotherapy relationship, but also many other kinds of important phenomena grounded in talk & conduct such as the alliance, empathy, emotional displays, epistemics and change, just to name a few.

Call for Papers:

The overarching theme of this conference pertains to the psychotherapeutic relationship. Interest in the relationship between therapist and client has been central from the earliest days of psychotherapy. There is much agreement that the therapeutic relationship bears a significant relation to treatment outcome; it can help make therapy effective and provide a healing context for change. Most of the research on the therapy relationship to date has used quantitative methods drawn from clients, therapists or observers’ appraisal (e.g., based on questionnaires or checklist type measures). Much less energy has been committed to the detailed examination of the specifics of in-therapy events and how that may develop our qualitative understanding of how a therapy relationship is achieved through therapists’ and clients’ talk and conduct.

Conversation Analysis (CA), which examines the moment-by-moment sequential organization of social interaction in everyday and institutional contexts, and related disciplines have provided many insights into our understanding of how important psychotherapeutic ‘business’ is accomplished. This includes the psychotherapy relationship, but also many other kinds of important phenomena grounded in talk & conduct such as the alliance, empathy, emotional displays, epistemics and change, just to name a few.

The aim of this conference is to bring together researchers and practitioners from an international community to discuss new findings, methodological innovations and practical applications in this growing area of applied CA work. We welcome submissions that align with the conference theme, but also papers that address any relevant aspects of interactional practices used in psychotherapeutic contexts. Submissions that address relevant neighbouring forms of institutional practice (e.g., psychiatric consultations; psychological assessment; support-oriented help lines, home support visits, coaching and counselling) are also welcome. We hope the conference will be of interest to people from a variety of academic backgrounds (including psychotherapy, counselling, psychiatry, social work, linguistics, psychology, and sociology) and to practitioners from a wide-range of institutional settings who employ therapeutic practices in their work. Information regarding the conference format (e.g., in person or online) will be provided later in the year.

PRESENTATION FORMATS:

  1. Conference Paper
  • Brief report on empirical work addressing some relevant aspect of psychotherapeutic interaction
  1. Data Session
  • Discussion of video- or audio recordings and transcripts of psychotherapeutic interactions and/or sequences
  1. Workshop
  • Interactive forum that addresses important connections between psychotherapy and interaction research

SUBMISSION GUIDELINES:
Please visit our website: https://www.iccap.ugent.be

SUBMISSION DEADLINE:
Wednesday, March 31, 2021. Submission will open February 1. All submissions must be sent to: iccap2021@ugent.be. Please only use the submission form when you submit your abstract. The programme committee will send notices of acceptance by May 1, 2021.

CONFIRMED PLENARY SPEAKERS:
Professor Robert Elliott, University of Strathclyde/Glasgow
Professor Alexa Hepburn, Rutgers University/ New Jersey

We look forward to seeing you in Ghent in October!

CONTACT INFORMATION
Please direct any questions to Claudio Scarvaglieri or Peter Muntigl at iccap2021@ugent.be

For further information please consult our conference website: https://www.iccap.ugent.be

Construction grammars in and between minds, communities, computers

The international conference ICCG11 will take place at the University of Antwerp (UAntwerpen), Belgium, 18-20 August 2021. ICCG11 will cover a broad range of topics related to various constructionist approaches to language, including but not limited to cognitive construction grammar, embodied construction grammar, fluid construction grammar, radical construction grammar, sign based construction grammar, frame semantics. The conference also acts as a forum of discussion between different approaches. The theme of this edition of the conference is the following: how do constructions model language in minds, communities, or computers? Submissions for presentations, posters, or workshops are particularly welcomed along the lines of this theme, but submissions may also be related to other aspects of constructionist linguistics.

Call for Papers:

PRESENTATION FORMATS:
Full papers will be allotted 20 minutes, followed by 5-7 minutes for discussion. Posters will be presented in a special session and remain on display during the conference.

SUBMISSION OF ABSTRACTS FOR THE GENERAL SESSION:
Abstracts for General Session papers and posters can be submitted until 15 February 2021. Please visit https://www.uantwerpen.be/en/conferences/construction-grammars/calls-and-circulars/, where you will also find a submission template (or go to the submission facility directly: https://easychair.org/conferences/?conf=iccg11).

Abstracts should not exceed 400 words (exclusive of references) and should clearly state research questions, approach, method, data and (expected) results. Abstracts should also list three to five keywords.

Since all abstracts will be submitted to blind review, no author-specific information must be available in the text of the abstract or in the file metadata.

Abstracts will not be edited for typing, spelling, or grammatical errors after submission. Therefore, abstracts should comply with the layout requirements:
– Abstracts must be single-spaced and fully justified. The standard font will be Calibri, size 11. Margins should be set at 2,54 cm (1 inch) all around.
– References will have a hanging indent of 1,27 cm (0.5 inch).
– Submit the abstract as a .doc, .docx or .odt document. If it contains special characters, please send a PDF version to iccg11uantwerpen.be.

EXISTING SUBMISSIONS:
If you already submitted an abstract for the conference during the first call before postponement due to COVID19, the following guidelines apply:
– In case your abstract was accepted, it remains accepted
– You are given the opportunity to revise your accepted abstract until the new submission deadline
– If you plan on presenting on a different topic instead, please make a new submission (do not replace an existing submission in this case!)
– If you no longer want to present your accepted abstract, please notify us, so that we can remove it
– In case your abstract was not accepted, you are free to submit a new, revised version of your abstract, which will be treated as a new submission

MULTIPLE PAPERS:
One person may submit a single-authored abstract and a co-authored one (not as first author) or two co-authored abstracts (only one as first author). Note that keynote papers within workshops count as ordinary papers.

EVALUATION:
Abstracts submitted to the general session and to the poster session will be evaluated by two members of the Scientific Committee. Workshop papers receive two evaluations by Scientific Committee members and one by the workshop convenor(s).

NOTIFICATIONS:
Notifications of acceptance will be sent out by 31 March 2021.

24th DiscourseNet Conference

Discourse and Communication as Propaganda: digital and multimodal forms of activism, persuasion and disinformation across ideologies

18-20 May 2020,  Brussels, Belgium

This conference provides a forum for researchers who seek to analyze, challenge, and (re)think the concept and the practice of propaganda in the light of contemporary forms of discourse and communication across the ideological spectrum. 

We invite authors to examine the relationship between concepts such as propaganda, ideology, hegemony and discourse in today’s digital environment. Both empirical and theoretical contributions are welcome.

Call for Papers: 

The notion of propaganda was seminal to the field of communication studies in the beginning of the 20th century. It derives its negative connotations from the way mass media have been intentionally used by state and corporate actors for partisan interests. Even though the term ‘propaganda’ may have grown out of fashion – both inside and outside of academia – its practices have not. 

Notions such as ‘public relations’, ‘advertising’, ‘political marketing’, ‘public diplomacy’, ‘political marketing’ and ‘advocacy’ have now transplanted propaganda even though they often refer to similar discursive strategies of persuasion or (dis)information. As the term ‘propaganda’ grew less popular new terms emerged in order to label similar communication strategies that shape contemporary discourse and communication until this day. 

Many critical approaches in discourse studies have treated propagandistic modes of communication through the lenses of ‘ideology’, ‘hegemony’, ‘discourse’ and ‘power’. However, whereas all propaganda is ideological, not all ideology manifests itself as propaganda. Likewise, whereas all propaganda operates through discourse and communication, not all discourse or communication performs the function of propaganda. 

Different forms of critical discourse studies have paid attention to ideological phenomena, but the term propaganda is remarkably absent from this field of inquiry. This may be explained with reference to underlying theoretical premises of specific discourse theoretical and discourse analytical approaches, a hypothesis that may also be explored at this conference. 

In a global context marked by ‘a return of the political’, by an intensification of political debates across the political spectrum, and by a (re-)articulation of old and new political fault lines crossing local, regional, national and/or transnational contexts, the seemingly outdated notion of propaganda may provide a useful entry point for examining the (partially) strategic modes of communication practiced by activists on all sides of the ideological spectrum. 

If propaganda is no longer associated exclusively with traditional institutional actors such as the state or corporations, the political and communicative strategies of social and political actors such as eco-activists, AltRight trolls, neoliberal think tanks or the peace movement may be (re)thought in terms of propaganda. This brings us back to the old question whether (specific forms of) propaganda hinder or facilitate democracy. It also leads us to explore uses of digital and algorithmic propaganda in contemporary populist projects. 

Regardless of the question whether and how the term propaganda is used, ‘strategies’ of white, black and grey propaganda are practiced on an everyday basis while new ways of doing propaganda continue to be developed. In fact, propaganda practices are constantly being adapted to specific social, political and technological developments. As new technologies become available, the range of actors able to practice propaganda expands. 

We especially welcome papers that rethink the notions of propaganda and activism in relation to key concepts in discourse studies. Such notions include power, subjectivity, reflexivity, critique, identity, context, language use and multimodal communication. Papers may also focus on the ethical problems that come with propagandistic activities. 

For abstract submission, visit: https://dn24.sciencesconf.org/

BCGL 12: Suppletion, allomorphy, and syncretism

Brussels, December 16-17 2019.

CRISSP is proud to present the twelfth instalment of the Brussels Conference on Generative Linguistics (BCGL), devoted to suppletion, allomorphy, and syncretism.

Workshop description

Suppletion is a form of morphological irregularity whereby a change in a grammatical category triggers a change in word form, with a different (suppletive) root substituting for the normal one (e.g. in the past tense of go, the irregular form went replaces the regular goed). Allomorphy is (in a certain sense) the mirror image of suppletion, namely a change in the form of an affix that is triggered by the presence of a particular type of root (e.g with the root ox the irregular plural morpheme -en replaces the regular form -s). Both suppletion and allomorphy raise the question of how to get the correct distribution of forms: how to pair the correct root with the correct allomorph, and how to correctly restrict the occurrence of the suppletive roots. If all lexical insertion is done at terminal nodes, then suppletion and allomorphy point to some ‘action at a distance’: a head α influences the realisation of another head β (e.g. the V and the T node in the case of go + PST, the N and the Num node in the case of ox + PL). This raises the question of locality: how far apart can α and β be? A range of different views has been proposed in the literature, such as the claim that α and β are local if no overt node intervenes (Embick, 2010; Calabrese, 2015), if they form a span (Abels & Muriungi, 2008; Svenonius, 2016; Merchant, 2015; Haugen & Siddiqi, 2016), if they belong to the same phase (Moskal, 2013a; Embick, 2010; Moskal, 2015), if α is accessible to β (Moskal, 2013b; Moskal & Smith, 2016), if no XP or Xn (n > 0) intervenes (Bobaljik 2012 and Bobaljik & Harley 2017 respectively), if no γ intervenes (Siegel, 1978; Allen, 1978; Embick, 2003; Bobaljik, 2012; Kilbourn-Ceron et al., 2016), or if they form a constituent (Caha, 2017a; De Clercq & Vanden Wyngaerd, 2017).

Syncretism is the identity of forms across different (but related) grammatical categories (e.g. the pronoun you is both 2SG and 2PL). Syncretism is widely believed to be informative about the underlying grammatical system, across a variety of approaches, whether typological (Haspelmath, 2003), formal (Caha, 2009; Bobaljik & Sauerland, 2013), or paradigm-based (McCreight & Chvany, 1991; Plank, 1991; Johnston, 1996; Wiese, 2008). Syncretism may accordingly be used to structure paradigms in such a way that syncretic cells are always adjacent, i.e. avoiding ABA patterns. Caha’s (2009) study of *ABA patterns in Case marking paradigms furthermore interprets syncretism in terms of structural containment: if the structure of the more complex Case suffixes properly contains that of the less complex ones, then *ABA follows. The study of syncretism in morphology in this approach translates into a study of underlying structural relationships.

We welcome contributions addressing suppletion, allomorphy, and/or syncretism in various formal models (Distributed Morphology, the Exo-Skeletal Model, Minimalist Morphology, Nanosyntax, etc.). Possible topics include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • What is the mechanism by which roots and affixes select one other? How are different classes of roots selecting different allomorphs represented in the lexicon? Can root size determine the selection of the allomorph (Caha et al., 2019)?
  • What is the boundary (if any) between suppletion and phonological readjustment of a root, e.g. in the pair givegave (Halle & Marantz, 1993; Embick & Marantz, 2008; Borer, 2003, 2013)?
  • Is root suppletion restricted to the functional part of the vocabulary, as claimed in Marantz (1997), or does it apply more broadly, as claimed by Haugen & Siddiqi (2013); Harley (2014) (but see Borer 2014)?
  • Is there a prefix/suffix asymmetry in allomorphy, and if so, why (Moskal, 2013a)?
  • Are there ways to derive *ABA patterns that do not rely on strict containment, as suggested in Bobaljik & Sauerland (2018); Caha (2017b)?
  • Which approach to deriving syncretism yields the best results, the one in terms of underspecification (i.e. the Subset Principle; Halle 1997), or the one in terms of overspecification (the Superset Principle; Starke 2009), or perhaps other types of approaches (e.g. McCreight & Chvany 1991)?
  • What are the locality conditions governing suppletion, allomorphy, and syncretism?

Invited speakers

  • Heidi Harley (U of Tucson, Arizona)
  • Hagit Borer (QMUL, London)
  • Michal Starke (Masaryk U, Brno)

Abstract guidelines

Abstracts should not exceed two pages, including data, references and diagrams. Abstracts should be typed in at least 11-point font, with one-inch margins (letter-size; 8½ inch by 11 inch or A4) and a maximum of 50 lines of text per page. Abstracts must be anonymous and submissions are limited to 2 per author, at least one of which is co-authored. Only electronic submissions will be accepted. Please submit your abstract using the EasyChair link for BCGL11: https://easychair.org/conferences/?conf=bcgl12

Important dates

  • First call for papers: June 12, 2019
  • Second call for papers: August 16, 2019
  • Abstract submission deadline: September 15, 2019
  • Notification of acceptance: October 16, 201
  • Conference: December 16-17, 2019

Conference webpage

http://www.crissp.be/bcgl-12-suppletion-allomorphy-and-syncretism/

Conference location

CRISSP – KU Leuven Brussels Campus
Stormstraat 2
1000 Brussels
Belgium

11th International Conference on Construction Grammar (ICCG11)

Construction grammars in and between minds, communities, computers

ICCG11 will take place at the University of Antwerp (UAntwerpen), Belgium, 20-22 August 2020. ICCG11 will cover a broad range of topics related to constructionist approaches to language. The conference also acts as a forum of discussion between approaches, including cognitive construction grammar, embodied construction grammar, fluid construction grammar, radical construction grammar, sign based construction grammar, frame semantics, or other approaches. The conference theme is: how do constructions model language in minds, communities, or computers? Submissions for presentations, posters, or workshops are particularly welcomed along the lines of this theme, but submissions may also be related to other aspects of constructionist linguistics.

CONFIRMED PLENARY SPEAKERS

Nick Ellis (University of Michigan) – language learning

Luc Steels (Universitat Pompeu Fabra Barcelona) – computational linguistics

Evelina (Ev) Fedorenko (MIT) – neurolinguistics

Gabriele Diewald (Hannover University) – historical linguistics

Steffen Höder (Kiel University) – language contact

CALL FOR PAPERS

Information on how to submit an abstract is available here.

CfP: Sixth Ghent Colloquium on Afrikaans

16-18 October 2019, Ghent, Belgium

The Ghent research group on Afrikaans and the study of South Africa organises an annual colloquium on the linguistics and literature of Afrikaans. The overall theme of the linguistic component of this year’s edition is ‘Language Variation in Afrikaans’, broadly construed (i.e. including geographical, social, stylistic, etc. variation in present-day Afrikaans as well as diachronic variation). The plenary speaker is Gerald Stell (The Polytechnic University of Hong Kong), who will present new research on Namibian Afrikaans.
The conference languages are Afrikaans and Dutch.

Call for Papers:

We invite abstracts for original research papers on any aspect of language variation in Afrikaans, past or present. Possible topics include — but are definitely not limited to:

– the relations between Standard Afrikaans and other varieties of the language;
– the status, use and linguistic characteristics of Cape Afrikaans;
– the restandardisation debate;
– the emergence of new sociolects;
– the use of Afrikaans outside South Africa and the properties of expat Afrikaans;
– the use of Afrikaans in specific text types or contexts.

In addition, we also welcome papers dealing with variation along geographical, social, ethnic, stylistic, etc. lines in the use or properties of specific lexical or grammatical items or phenomena, as well as papers which shed new light on the diachrony of Afrikaans in general or of specific linguistic phenomena.

Please send your anonymous abstract as an attachment in pdf- and doc(x)-format to afrikaans@UGent.be by April 15 and include name(s) and affiliation(s) in the body of the abstract. The maximal length is 500 words, including examples and references. Abstracts are preferably in Afrikaans or Dutch. Abstracts in English are welcome, too, but please note that speakers will be expected to give the actual presentation in Afrikaans or Dutch.

Notification of acceptance will be sent by mid-May.

CFP: Novel Perspectives on Communication Practices in Antiquity Towards a Historical Social-Semiotic Approach

03-05 Oct-2019, Ghent, Belgium

We are delighted to invite interested scholars and colleagues to participate in the opening event of the ERC-project ‘Everyday writing in Graeco-Roman and Late Antique Egypt. A socio-semiotic study of communicative variation’ (2018-2023).

The main aim of the conference is to explore to what ex­tent it is possible and desirable to found a discipline such as historical social-semiotics, parallel to historical socio-linguistics. This novel, interdisciplinary approach is particularly relevant for ‘everyday’ documentary texts: since these texts represent autographs, their external characteristics can also be brought into interpretation. Some of the characteristics to be considered as expressions of social meaning (functioning as ‘semiotic resources’) are – but are not limited to – writing material, document format, and language choice.
The conference will mainly focus on documentary texts from the Mediterranean region, roughly spanning the period from the first millennium BCE to the first millennium CE.

Confirmed speakers include:

James Clackson (Cambridge)
Mark Depauw (Leuven)
Jean-Luc Fournet (Paris)
Antonella Ghignoli (Rome)
Tonio Sebastian Richter (Berlin)
Petra Sijpesteijn (Leiden)

Call for Papers:

Please submit a one-page English abstract to evwrit@ugent.be by April 30, 2019. Notification of acceptance will be given by June 1, 2019.

A full version of the CfP can be found here: http://www.evwrit.ugent.be/events/