PhD fellowship in Corpus Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at UCLouvain

The Centre for English Corpus Linguistics has an opening for a PhD fellowship for a total period of four years, starting as of October 2018 (later is also a possibility).

The position is part of the UCLouvain FSR-funded research project Particle placement and genitive alternations in EFL learner spoken syntax: core probabilistic grammar and/or L1specific preferences?(Promotor: Dr. Magali Paquot). The project stems from collaborative work between the promotor, Prof. B. Szmrecsanyi (KU Leuven) and Dr. J. Grafmiller (University of Birmingham) (e.g. Paquot, Grafmiller & Szmrecsanyi (2017)).

The PhD student will investigate the extent to which English as a Foreign Language (EFL) learners share a core probabilistic grammar (cf. Bresnan, 2007) with users of first and second language varieties of English by analyzing variation in grammatical constraints on the particle placement alternation (for transitive phrasal verbs) and the genitive alternation in corpora of EFL learner spoken language. Methodologically, the candidate will build on annotation guidelines developed by Szmrecsanyi, Grafmiller and colleagues to describe the predictors that may influence speakers’ choice governing the alternations; s/he will also be expected to use a range of variationist analysis techniques.

Job description:

The research project is a joint venture between the Centre for English Corpus Linguistics (CECL) at the UCLouvain and the Quantitative Lexicology and Variational Linguistics (QLVL) group at the KU Leuven.The candidate will be affiliated to the Institut Langage et Communication (ILC, UCLouvain) and will also prepare a joint UCLouvain-KU Leuven PhD in Linguistics.

Activities that the candidate will perform include:

  • develop and implement (i) theoretical concepts in line with the focus of the research project and (ii) appropriate methodological procedures for investigating these concepts;
  • conduct corpus-based analyses of L1 and L2 writing and spoken samples;
  • interpret the results of the analyses and report on the project in conference presentations and academic publications;
  • carry out a research stay at the University of Birmingham (to work in close collaboration with Dr. J. Grafmiller too);
  • by the end of the four-year term, submit and defend a PhD dissertation based on the project.

Requirements and profile:

  • Master degree in Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Language & Literature, Natural Language Processing or in Language Learning and Teaching;
  • excellent record of BA and MA level study;
  • excellent command of English.
  • excellent and demonstrated analytic skills;
  • ability to work with common software packages (including MS Word, Excel and PowerPoint);
  • basic knowledge of corpus-linguistic techniques is a requirement
  • knowledge of statistics and statistical software is an asset;
  • programming skills in Perl, Python or R are also an asset;
  • excellent and demonstrated self-management skills, ability and willingness to work in a team;
  • willingness to live in or near Louvain-la-Neuve and to travel abroad (for short-term research stays and to attend international academic conferences).

Terms of employment:

  • The contract will initially be for one year, three times renewable, with a total of four years.
  • The candidate receives a doctoral fellowship grant (starting at approx. EUR 1900 net per month) and full medical insurance.
  • The candidate will be expected to apply for a FNRS position after the first year.
  • The position requires residence in Belgium.
  • Applicants from outside the EU are responsible for obtaining the necessary visa or permits, with the assistance of UCLouvain staff department.

Application Deadline: Review of applications will begin on 20 August 2018, and continue until the position is filled

Please include with your application:

  • a cover letter in English, in which you specify why you are interested in this position and how you meet the job requirements outlined above;
  • a curriculum vitae in English;
  • a concise academic statement in English in which you outline your expectations about and plans for graduate study and career goals;
  • a copy of BA and MA diplomas and degrees;
  • a copy of your master thesis and academic publications (if applicable);
  • the names and full contact details of two academic referees.

Shortlisted candidates will be invited for an interview (in situ or via video conferencing) in September 2018 (or later).

Applications (as an email attachment) and inquiries should be addressed to:

Dr. Magali Paquot

Centre for English Corpus Linguistics

Université Catholique de Louvain

Email: magali.paquot@uclouvain.be

References

Bresnan, J. (2007). Is syntactic knowledge probabilistic ? Experiments with the English dative alternation. In S. Featherston and W. Sternefeld (eds). Roots: Linguistics in Search of its Evidential Base. Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter, 75-96.

Paquot, M, Grafmiller, J. & B. Szmrecsanyi (2017).Particle placement alternation in EFL learner speech vs. native and ESL spoken Englishes: core probabilistic grammar and/or L1-specific preferences? Paper presented at the 4th Learner Corpus Research Conference, 5-7 October 2017, Bolzano, Italy.

PhD fellowship “Beyond the clause: Encoding and inference in clause combining”, KULeuven

PhD-Fellowship in historical linguistics (Spanish) at the University of Leuven
A new research project at the Department of Linguistics of the University of Leuven is looking for applicants for a fully funded four-year PhD fellowship in Spanish historical linguistics (starting date: October/November 2018).

The PhD fellowship is part of a larger collaborative project entitled ”Beyond the clause: Encoding and inference in clause combining”, funded by the Research Council of the University of Leuven. The team heading the project is composed of Bert Cornillie, Kristin Davidse, Elwys De Stefani and Jean-Christophe Verstraete. The supervisors of this fellowship are Bert Cornillie and Malte Rosemeyer.
The aim of the PhD project is to analyse the diachronic development of que- deletion in Spanish complement constructions, as in, e.g., Por ende vos rogamos le dedes entera fee y creencia (anon. 1497) lit.: ‘therefore we ask you you give him total faith and belief’. The project will focus on the origin, extension and demise of que-deletion, in interaction with developments in clause-internal marking (especially mood marking and subject expression), as well as contact influence (contact with Latin, Discourse Traditions). The project will examine whether que-deletion is part of a more general process of restructuring of the complementation system from medieval Castilian to modern Spanish. More information about the project can be requested by e-mail to one of the supervisors (see below).

Applications are invited from candidates with the following qualifications:
– An MA in linguistics or philology (or equivalent, e.g. BA Hons), with academic distinction
– Strong analytical skills and the motivation to pursue creative work in linguistics
– A (near)native command of Spanish and a good command of English
– Experience with historical corpus linguistics, preferably in Spanish
– Willingness to acquire the necessary statistical know-how for the analysis of the data
– A cooperative attitude and the capacity to actively participate in project activities (e.g. in data sessions) and in events of the research units involved in the project (including their seminar series)
– The ability to present research results at international conferences, and to publish in peer-reviewed journals

Motivated candidates meeting these criteria are invited to apply online at the application web address below.

Please include a cover letter, a CV, the names of up to three referees we may contact, and a sample piece of academic writing. The deadline for applications is 1 July 2018.
Interviews will be held with shortlisted candidates on 9-10 July (in person or online for overseas applicants). A decision will be communicated by mid-July.

The fellow will receive a salary of approximately 2000 EUR/month (after taxes) for a period of four years and all regular provisions for PhD fellows at the University of Leuven. In addition, s/he will be allocated office space and a laptop, and receive funding for research activities like attending conferences abroad and organizing workshops and conferences in Leuven or elsewhere. For more information on the application process, working conditions and career opportunities as a PhD fellow at the University of Leuven see https://www.kuleuven.be/personeel/jobsite/en/phd.
The successful candidate may be asked to provide (limited) assistance with teaching, student supervision and data management. S/he will join a dynamic research team (faculty members, postdoctoral fellows and PhD students).

For further information, please contact one of the supervisors using the contact information below.
Starting date: October/November 2018
End date: September 2022

Applications Deadline: 01-Jul-2018

Web Address for Applications: https://www.kuleuven.be/personeel/jobsite/jobs/54680873

Contact Information:
Cornillie , Bert
bert.cornillie@kuleuven.be

Rosemeyer, Malte
malte.rosemeyer@kuleuven.be

PhD Position “Analogy in language change”, KULeuven

A fully funded four-year PhD position is offered as part of the project ”Making the invisible uninvisible: the role of analogy in language change”. The project seeks to use corpus evidence to gain better insight into the workings of analogy as a mechanism of grammatical change. To this end, it will focus specifically on the history of a small subsystem of the grammar of English, adnumeral markers. The project will be supervised by Prof. Hendrik De Smet, in collaboration with Graeme Trousdale (University of Edinburgh) and Peter Petré (University of Antwerp). The project is to be carried out within the Leuven-based research group ‘Functional and Cognitive Linguistics: Grammar & Typology’ (FunC), which is part of the Department of Linguistics. More information on the project and eligibility requirements can be found through the link below.

Applications Deadline: 01-Jul-2018

Web Address for Applications: http://www.kuleuven.be/personeel/jobsite/jobs/54676146

Contact Information:
Prof. Hendrik De Smet
hendrik.desmet@kuleuven.be
Phone:+32 16 32 47 72

CFP: Vocab@Leuven

The third Vocab@ conference will be hosted by KU Leuven from 1 to 3 July 2019.

Previous Vocab@ conferences were held at Meiji Gakuin University in Tokyo in 2016 and Victoria University Wellington in 2013.

The Vocab@Leuven conference aims to bring together researchers from different disciplines who investigate the learning, processing, teaching, and testing of second/foreign language vocabulary.

Confirmed plenary speakers:

Batia Laufer (University of Haifa)
Marc Brysbaert (Ghent University)

Organizing committee:

Elke Peters
Paul Pauwels
Maribel Montero Perez
Eva Puimège
Ann-Sophie Noreillie
Thao Duong

We will invite abstracts for paper and poster presentations about any topic related to second/foreign language vocabulary:

Strands:

– vocabulary teaching (classroom-based research, technology-based, formal/informal learning, …)
– vocabulary assessment
– vocabulary and the skills of reading, listening, TV viewing, writing and speaking
– formulaic language
– corpus approaches to vocabulary
– psycholinguistic approaches to vocabulary
– neurolinguistic approaches to vocabulary
– vocabulary for specialized use (academic, business, technical, etc.)
– vocabulary resources (word lists, dictionaries, …)
– vocabulary and genre/register

Types of presentations will include:
– individual paper (20 + 10 minutes)
– poster

Submission deadline will be: December 15, 2018

Website : https://vocabatleuven.wordpress.com

PhD fellowship in linguistic typology, University of Leuven

A new research project at the Department of Linguistics of the University of Leuven is looking for applicants for a fully funded four-year PhD fellowship in linguistic typology (starting date: October/November 2018).

The PhD fellowship is part of a larger collaborative project entitled ”Beyond the clause: Encoding and inference in clause combining”, funded by the Research Council of the University of Leuven. The team heading the project is composed of Bert Cornillie, Kristin Davidse, Elwys De Stefani and Jean-Christophe Verstraete. The supervisor of this fellowship is Jean-Christophe Verstraete.

The aim of the PhD project is to investigate the relation between specialized marking of clause linkage (e.g. conjunctions) and inferences from other categories (e.g. modal or information-structural markers). The project will use data from a large, representative sample of Australian languages, which tend to lack specialized clause linkage markers and rely on inferences from other means. This will contribute to the larger collaborative project by producing a cross-linguistic baseline for patterns of inference in clause combining. More information about the project can be requested by e-mail.

Applications are invited from candidates with the following qualifications:
– An MA in linguistics (or equivalent, eg BA Hons), with academic distinction.
– Experience with linguistic typology and/or linguistic fieldwork.
– Strong analytical skills and the motivation to pursue creative work in linguistics.
– A good command of English.
– A cooperative attitude and the capacity to actively participate in project activities (e.g. data sessions) and in events of the research units involved in the project (including their seminar series).
– The ability to present research results at international conferences, and to publish in peer-reviewed journals.

Motivated candidates meeting these criteria are invited to apply online according to the instructions given at the Application Link below and please include:
– a cover letter,
– a CV,
– the names of up to three referees we may contact, and
– a sample piece of academic writing.

The deadline for applications is 1 July 2018.

Interviews will be held with shortlisted candidates on 9-10 July (in person or online for overseas applicants). A decision will be communicated by mid-July.

The fellow will receive a salary of approximately 2000 EUR/month (after taxes) for a period of four years and all regular provisions for PhD fellows at the University of Leuven. In addition, s/he will be allocated office space and a laptop, and receive funding for research activities like attending conferences abroad and organizing workshops and conferences in Leuven or elsewhere.

The successful candidate may be asked to provide (limited) assistance with teaching, student supervision and data management. S/he will join a dynamic research team (faculty members, postdoctoral fellows and PhD students).

For further information, please contact the project’s supervisor Jean-Christophe Verstraete at the contact below.

Starting date: October/November 2018
End date: September 2022

Applications Deadline: 01-Jul-2018

Web Address for Applications: https://www.kuleuven.be/personeel/jobsite/jobs/54666425

Contact Information:
Jean-Christophe Verstraete
jcv@kuleuven.be

10th Discourse, Communication and the Enterprise Conference

03-Jun-2019 – 05-Jun-2019, Leuven, Belgium

The DICOEN conference brings together researchers, practitioners and professionals who are interested in discourse and communication in organizational settings. These settings are broadly defined, self-evidently including prototypical businesses and for-profit organizations, but also non-profit organizations, such as legal, governmental and healthcare settings.

Call for Papers:

Research addressing discourse, communication and the role of language in a wide variety of organizational contexts is typically scattered across a range of disciplines. Remaining within the confines of the various scholarly traditions has two major drawbacks. Firstly, it prevents the cross-fertilization of ideas, and prevents research from gaining full momentum. Secondly, it prevents the scholarly developments and research findings to make their way into teaching and training, whether it concerns communication in the professions, business communication or management curricula. Therefore, DICOEN 10 offers an interdisciplinary forum for all those interested in the language-enterprise interface, bringing together a broad range of academic disciplines (including, but not limited to organizational and management studies, discourse analysis, conversation analysis, pragmatics, cognitive linguistics, forensic linguistics, teacher education, communication studies, social psychology, discursive psychology, anthropology), focusing on discourse and communication in a broad range of profit and non-profit organizations.

General Submission Guidelines:

The submission of proposals opens on 1 September 2018. We welcome the submission of proposals for panels and/or individual presentations.
Deadline call for panel proposals: 1 October 2018
Deadline call for papers: 15 November 2018

Panels:

We invite proposals for panels that address a common theme, method or theoretical topic and that bring together at least 3 individual papers. Panel proposals should be no longer than 800 words and should include:

– An overall description explaining the panel’s theme and objectives;
– A list of potential speakers and, if possible, provisional titles of their presentations.

Abstracts for individual papers in the panel (of up to 400 words each) will have to be submitted separately.

Individual paper presentations:

We invite proposals for individual paper presentations of up to 400 words (including references). All panel contributions have to be submitted as individual paper presentations as well, with an indication of the intended panel in which the paper will be presented. The time allotted to oral presentations will be 20 mins + 10 mins for questions and discussion.

The conference policy is ”one main oral presentation per author”. One may at the same time also be a panel organizer or a co-author of other oral presentations. It is important to note that the first author of each presentation always has to be (co-)presenting and thus has to be registered in order for the presentation to be included in the conference program.

Please see: https://www.arts.kuleuven.be/ling/dicoen2019/call

PhD fellowship in descriptive and contrastive linguistics, University of Leuven

Applications are invited for a fully funded four-year PhD fellowship in descriptive and contrastive linguistics (English-French) starting October or November 2018 at the Department of Linguistics of the University of Leuven.

The PhD is part of a larger collaborative project entitled ”Beyond the clause: Encoding and inference in clause combining”, funded by the Research Council of the University of Leuven. The team coordinating the project consists of Bert Cornillie, Kristin Davidse, Elwys De Stefani and Jean-Christophe Verstraete. The supervisors of this PhD are Kristin Davidse and Karen Lahousse (University of Leuven) and Gerard O’Grady (University of Cardiff).

The aim of this doctoral project is to compare clefts and their monoclausal counterparts (so-called “reduced clefts”) in English and French. The literature on clefts has tended to focus on the relation with their declefted alternate, often viewing different introducers such as ”it’s”/”c’est”, ”there’s”/”il y a” or ”I’ve”/”j’ai” as largely devoid of meaning. The starting hypothesis of this project is that it is actually clefts and simple specificational clauses (with corresponding introducers) that most resemble each other. The project is designed in terms of the contrasts cleft vs. reduced cleft and English vs. French. The phenomena to be analysed include morphosyntax, semantics-pragmatics, prosody, information structure and discourse functions. More information about the project can be requested by e-mail.

Applicants are expected to have the following qualifications and attitudes:
– An MA in linguistics (or related disciplines), with academic distinction;
– Expertise and (near-)native competence in English and French;
– Willingness to undertake instrumental study of prosody;
– A good background in the domains of linguistics relevant to the topic;
– Strong analytical skills and the motivation to pursue descriptively innovative work in linguistics;
– A cooperative attitude and the capacity to actively participate in the project activities (e.g. data sessions) and in events of the research units involved in the project (including their seminar series);
– The ability to present research results at international conferences, and to publish in peer-reviewed journals.

Motivated candidates meeting these criteria are invited to apply online according to the instructions given at the Application Link below and to include:
– A cover letter,
– A CV,
– The names of up to three referees,
– A sample piece of academic writing.

The deadline for applications is 1 July 2018.
Interviews will be held with shortlisted candidates on 9-10 July (in person or online for overseas applicants). A decision will be communicated by mid-July.

The fellow will receive a salary of approximately 2000 EUR/month (after taxes) for a period of four years and all regular provisions for PhD fellows at the University of Leuven. In addition, s/he will be allocated office space and a laptop, and receive funding for research activities such as attending conferences abroad and organising workshops and conferences in Leuven or elsewhere.
The successful candidate may be asked to provide (limited) assistance with teaching, student supervision and data management. S/he will join a dynamic research team (faculty members, postdoctoral fellows and PhD students).

For more information, you can contact the coordinator of this subproject, Kristin Davidse (see contact information below).

Applications Deadline: 01-Jul-2018

Web Address for Applications: http://www.kuleuven.be/personeel/jobsite/jobs/54675461

Contact Information:
Kristin Davidse
kristin.davidse@kuleuven.be
Phone:+32 16 32 48 11

BCGL11: The syntax and semantics of aspect

Brussels, December 10-11, 2018.

The Center for Research in Syntax, Semantics and Phonology (CRISSP) of KU Leuven invites abstracts for the 11th edition of the Brussels Conference on Generative Linguistics (BCGL 11) devoted to the syntax and semantics of aspect.

Workshop description

The purpose of the conference is to discuss and explore the syntax and semantics of aspect, including the interface between those two, as well as cross-linguistic variation within these domains.

The properties and representations of aspect have been studied extensively from both syntactic and semantic perspectives, as well as their interfaces.

As for the syntax, a central question is how aspectual notions such as telicity, duration, cause and change are represented in syntax. Approaches range from the minimalist structure of Erteschik-shir & Rapoport (2005), to a more fine-grained functional structure as proposed by Ramchand (2008), or with a clear differentiation between outer (external, presentational) and inner (internal, Aktionsart) aspect, as proposed by Travis (2010). More detailed studies of aspect have investigated, for example, the different types of perfect, such as universal, experiental, resultative and existential perfect (e.g. Pancheva 2003). Another relevant question is the distinction between morphological and periphrastic means to express aspectual distinctions. Both the more general and the more detailed studies raise the question of the division of labour between the syntax and the semantics (Ramchand 2008), i.e. on what is contributed by the (extended) syntactic structure of the verb carrying aspectual information, other elements in the syntactic structure, and the lexical semantics of the verb.

The semantics of aspect has also been widely studied. As in the syntax, a distinction is often made between outer and inner aspect, with tense scoping over grammatical (outer) aspect, and grammatical aspect scoping over aspectual class (inner aspect). This layered structure makes it possible to investigate (crosslinguistic variation in) the interaction between the lexical features of the verb, the semantics of the predicate-argument structure, the expression of progressive and perfective/imperfective aspect, and other elements in the sentence which can carry aspectual information (e.g. certain adverbs/adverbial phrases, negation). In this respect, questions arise about the nature of the interaction between perfectivity and telicity, or between tense and aspect (De Swart 2012). A second question concerns the exact setup of the different layers contributing to aspect (cf. Verkuyl 1999; Travis 2000, 2010; Ritter & Rosen 2005; Ramchand 2008). There is also debate about whether grammatical aspect and aspectual class are semantically interpreted by different mechanisms (Smith 1991/1997; Depraetere 1995; Filip 1999; Bertinetto & Delfitto 2000) or by the same ones (Moens & Steedman 1988; Parsons 1990; Kamp & Reyle 1993; De Swart 1998; Verkuyl 1999; Cipria & Roberts 2000). More specific questions to be addressed at the conference include, but are not limited to, the following:

Syntax:

• What are the limits of variation in the expression of aspect? If we assume flexibility in size of and order within the aspectual layer, how much flexibility is there?

• How do languages grammaticalise verbal aspect? What is the range of the variation

observed? Do the present distinctions of grammatical categories suffice?

• Periphrastic constructions are usually included in the category of progressives ‘if they display a medium-to-high degree of grammaticalization and routinization’ (Mair 2012: 804). Can this criterion be grounded in an objective measure of grammaticalisation?

Semantics:

• What kinds of interaction of tense/aspect with non-truth-conditional meaning are possible (e.g., presuppositional imperfective in Russian, cf. Grønn 2004, Borik & Gehrke 2018)?

• How can we formalise anaphoric/referential aspect (Grønn 2004, Grønn & von Stechow 2016, Demirdache & Uribe-Etxebarria 2014)?

• Do the different types of syntactic realisations of aspect have different semantics?

• What kind of semantic mismatches are possible and how can we encode them? (e.g., the present perfect puzzle; Klein 1995)

Syntax-semantics interface:

• What is the division of labour between syntax and semantics, and how much crosslinguistic variation is there with relation to this division of labour?

Invited speakers

• Berit Gehrke (Humboldt Universität, Berlin)

• Roumyana Pancheva (University of Southern California)

• Gillian Ramchand (The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø)

Abstract guidelines

Abstracts should not exceed two pages, including data, references and diagrams. Abstracts should be typed in at least 11-point font, with one-inch margins (letter-size; 8½ inch by 11 inch or A4) and a maximum of 50 lines of text per page. Abstracts must be anonymous and submissions are limited to 2 per author, at least one of which is co-authored. Only electronic submissions will be accepted. Please submit your abstract using the EasyChair link for BCGL11: https://easychair.org/conferences/?conf=bcgl11

Important dates

• First call for papers: June 1, 2018

• Second call for papers: August 16, 2018

• Abstract submission deadline: September 15, 2018

• Notification of acceptance: October 16, 2018

• Conference: December 10-11, 2018

Conference location

CRISSP – KU Leuven Brussels Campus
Stormstraat 2
1000 Brussels
Belgium

BCGL11: The syntax and semantics of aspect

Brussels, December 10-11, 2018.

The Center for Research in Syntax, Semantics and Phonology (CRISSP) of KU Leuven invites abstracts for the 11th edition of the Brussels Conference on Generative Linguistics (BCGL 11) devoted to the syntax and semantics of aspect.

Workshop description

The purpose of the conference is to discuss and explore the syntax and semantics of aspect, including the interface between those two, as well as cross-linguistic variation within these domains.

The properties and representations of aspect have been studied extensively from both syntactic and semantic perspectives, as well as their interfaces.

As for the syntax, a central question is how aspectual notions such as telicity, duration, cause and change are represented in syntax. Approaches range from the minimalist structure of Erteschik-shir & Rapoport (2005), to a more fine-grained functional structure as proposed by Ramchand (2008), or with a clear differentiation between outer (external, presentational) and inner (internal, Aktionsart) aspect, as proposed by Travis (2010). More detailed studies of aspect have investigated, for example, the different types of perfect, such as universal, experiental, resultative and existential perfect (e.g. Pancheva 2003). Another relevant question is the distinction between morphological and periphrastic means to express aspectual distinctions. Both the more general and the more detailed studies raise the question of the division of labour between the syntax and the semantics (Ramchand 2008), i.e. on what is contributed by the (extended) syntactic structure of the verb carrying aspectual information, other elements in the syntactic structure, and the lexical semantics of the verb.

The semantics of aspect has also been widely studied. As in the syntax, a distinction is often made between outer and inner aspect, with tense scoping over grammatical (outer) aspect, and grammatical aspect scoping over aspectual class (inner aspect). This layered structure makes it possible to investigate (crosslinguistic variation in) the interaction between the lexical features of the verb, the semantics of the predicate-argument structure, the expression of progressive and perfective/imperfective aspect, and other elements in the sentence which can carry aspectual information (e.g. certain adverbs/adverbial phrases, negation). In this respect, questions arise about the nature of the interaction between perfectivity and telicity, or between tense and aspect (De Swart 2012). A second question concerns the exact setup of the different layers contributing to aspect (cf. Verkuyl 1999; Travis 2000, 2010; Ritter & Rosen 2005; Ramchand 2008). There is also debate about whether grammatical aspect and aspectual class are semantically interpreted by different mechanisms (Smith 1991/1997; Depraetere 1995; Filip 1999; Bertinetto & Delfitto 2000) or by the same ones (Moens & Steedman 1988; Parsons 1990; Kamp & Reyle 1993; De Swart 1998; Verkuyl 1999; Cipria & Roberts 2000). More specific questions to be addressed at the conference include, but are not limited to, the following:

Syntax:

• What are the limits of variation in the expression of aspect? If we assume flexibility in size of and order within the aspectual layer, how much flexibility is there?

• How do languages grammaticalise verbal aspect? What is the range of the variation

observed? Do the present distinctions of grammatical categories suffice?

• Periphrastic constructions are usually included in the category of progressives ‘if they display a medium-to-high degree of grammaticalization and routinization’ (Mair 2012: 804). Can this criterion be grounded in an objective measure of grammaticalisation?

Semantics:

• What kinds of interaction of tense/aspect with non-truth-conditional meaning are possible (e.g., presuppositional imperfective in Russian, cf. Grønn 2004, Borik & Gehrke 2018)?

• How can we formalise anaphoric/referential aspect (Grønn 2004, Grønn & von Stechow 2016, Demirdache & Uribe-Etxebarria 2014)?

• Do the different types of syntactic realisations of aspect have different semantics?

• What kind of semantic mismatches are possible and how can we encode them? (e.g., the present perfect puzzle; Klein 1995)

Syntax-semantics interface:

• What is the division of labour between syntax and semantics, and how much crosslinguistic variation is there with relation to this division of labour?

Invited speakers

• Berit Gehrke (Humboldt Universität, Berlin)

• Roumyana Pancheva (University of Southern California)

• Gillian Ramchand (The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø)

Abstract guidelines

Abstracts should not exceed two pages, including data, references and diagrams. Abstracts should be typed in at least 11-point font, with one-inch margins (letter-size; 8½ inch by 11 inch or A4) and a maximum of 50 lines of text per page. Abstracts must be anonymous and submissions are limited to 2 per author, at least one of which is co-authored. Only electronic submissions will be accepted. Please submit your abstract using the EasyChair link for BCGL11: https://easychair.org/conferences/?conf=bcgl11

Important dates

• First call for papers: June 1, 2018

• Second call for papers: August 16, 2018

• Abstract submission deadline: September 15, 2018

• Notification of acceptance: October 16, 2018

• Conference: December 10-11, 2018

Conference location

CRISSP – KU Leuven Brussels Campus
Stormstraat 2
1000 Brussels
Belgium

Brussels Transparency Workshop 2018 – “The Epistemic Transparency of Mental and Linguistic Content”

13-Jun-2018 – 14-Jun-2018, Bruxelles, Belgium

According to externalism (or anti-individualism), the contents of mental states are individuated in part by facts about the physical and/or the social environment in which the states are embedded. Externalism has become the dominant view in the philosophy of mind. Putnam’s (1975) and Burge’s (1979) thought experiments convinced most philosophers that subjects situated in relevantly dissimilar environments could be in the same (narrow) psychological states and yet think thoughts whose contents are true under different conditions. However, Boghossian (1994, 2015) argued that externalism conflicts with (comparative) transparency, the thesis that a thinker is able to know on a priori grounds, without the benefit of further empirical investigation, whether two of her occurrent thoughts have the same or different content(s). If the individuation of our mental contents depends on the environment, then, providing that we do not know a priori how our environment is, it should follow that (in the relevant, comparative sense) we cannot know a priori what we are thinking.

This result threatens a traditional account of self-knowledge which grants that subjects have privileged access to the contents of their own thoughts. One problem here, Boghossian claimed, is that externalism thereby blurs the line, to which assessments of rationality and psychological explanations are sensitive, between logical and factual errors (see also Kripke 1979). Given externalism, it appears that subjects who look intuitively rational will not be able to avoid some simple contradictions and invalid inferences without receiving more factual information about their environment. In response to this challenge, and among many other attempts, Stalnaker (2008) and Recanati (2012, 2016) have recently developed different compatibilist strategies purporting to reconcile externalism and transparency. Stalnaker’s contextual and attributor-dependent account of content invokes tacit identity presuppositions to rescue the rationality of the subjects in the hardest cases (see the ensuing discussions in Boghossian 2011 and Stalnaker 2011). Recanati concedes that contents are opaque but argues that mental files, construed as vehicles of thoughts supposed to play some of the traditional roles of modes of presentation, are transparent. The aim of this workshop is to continue those ongoing debates and to seek new ways of reconciling externalism and transparency.

The meeting description can also be accessed here: https://externalismtransparency2018.wordpress.com/meeting-description/

Program:

The meeting will be held at Salle Henri Janne, ULB, Solbosch campus, Institut de sociologie, avenue Jeanne 44, 15th floor.

June 13:

9:00-9:15:
Registration

9:15-9:30:
Welcome address and introductory words by Gregory Bochner

9:30-11:30:
Paul Boghossian
“Transparency and Concepts”

11:30-11:45: Coffee break

11:45-12:45:
Gregory Bochner
tba

12:45-14:00: Lunch

14:00-16:00:
Robert Stalnaker
“Fragmentation and Singular Propositions”

16:00-16:15: Coffee break

16:15-17:15:
Amir Horowicz
“One’s content are not transparent to one”

17:15-20:00: Drinks/free time

20:00: Workshop dinner

June 14:

9:30-11:30:
François Recanati
“Slow Switching and the Transparency of Coreference”

11:30-11:45: Coffee break

11:45-12:45:
Bruno Leclercq & Philippe De Brabanter
“What does semantic deference leave to cognitive transparency?”

12:45-14:00: Lunch

14:00-15:00:
Elisabetta Sacchi
“A phenomenologically oriented account of compatibilism”

15:00-15:15: Coffee break

15:15-16:15:
Michael Schmitz
“Transparency and externalism from a 1st person point of view”

16:15:
Workshop ends