CFP: CogLingDays8

The CogLing Days are the biennial conference of the Belgium Netherlands Cognitive Linguistics Association (www.benecla.com). The 8th CogLing Days will be held at the Université catholique de Louvain in Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium, on December 13th and 14th 2018 (www.cogling2018.wordpress.com).

We welcome contributions reporting on recent research in the various strands of cognitive linguistics or other cognitively inspired usage-based approaches to language.

Abstracts must not exceed 500 words, including references, and should mention the main research question(s), methodology, data and (expected) results. Abstracts can be submitted for an oral presentation (20’ + discussion time) or a poster and will be reviewed anonymously. We also welcome theme session proposals. Please submit via Easychair
https://easychair.org/conferences/?conf=cogling8. You will be required to paste your abstract in the text box and to upload a pdf of your abstract. Please indicate your preference for an oral presentation or a poster.
The conference languages are English, Dutch and French.

Proposals for theme sessions (max. 500 word description + (tentative) titles and names of participants) should be submitted by 15 April 2018 to cogling8@uclouvain.be. When the theme session is accepted, individual abstracts should also be submitted via Easychair by 15 May 2018.  If your abstract is part of a theme session, please add the theme session title to your paper title.

Submission deadline proposals for theme sessions: 15 April 2018

Submission deadline abstracts: 15 May 2018

Notification of acceptance: 2 July 2018

Contact: Cogling8@uclouvain.be Continue reading

PLIN Day 2018: Technological innovation in language learning and teaching

The PLIN Day is an annual one-day thematic conference hosted by the Linguistics Research Unit of the Université catholique de Louvain (Belgium). The conference has established itself over the years as an international forum for the exchange of ideas among scholars and has brought together researchers from all over the world. The 2018 PLIN Day will take place on Friday, May 18th and is devoted to “Technological innovation in language learning and teaching”; it offers academics, professionals, undergraduate and postgraduate students an excellent opportunity to access, share and discuss cutting edge research in the field. The following (non-exhaustive) list of themes will be covered this year:
 
– Applying new insights from natural language processing to enhance digital scaffolding in language learning
– Using virtual reality and serious games to leverage task-based language learning and other complex learning environments
– Identifying the conditions under which mobile out-of-class language learning can produce the expected added value
– Exploring the potential of corpus linguistics for developing and implementing tools for language learning
 
The core programme of the conference will consist in keynote sessions but participants will also have the opportunity to present their most recent research and/or work in progress during an interactive poster session. We therefore invite researchers to submit abstracts addressing topics on new trends in technology supported language learning. The posters will be presented in English. Further information on the posters will be provided in due time. The presence of the author is required as short oral presentations of the posters will also be organised in a poster boost session. A prize will be awarded to the best poster presentation. Abstract submissions should be sent by 5 March 2018 to the following address: plindayucl@uclouvain.be.
 
Important Dates:
15 February, 2018: Registration opens
5 March, 2018: Deadline for abstract submissions
15 March, 2018: Notification of acceptance for a poster presentation
30 April, 2018: Early bird registration closes
 
Keynote Speakers:
Penelope Collins, University of California at Irvine
Dana Glabasova, Lancaster University
Agnes Kukulska-Hulme, The Open University
Gérald Schlemminger, University of Education Karlsruhe
Steve Thorne, University of Portland

CFP: Failing Identities: Identification and Resistance

20-21 September 2018
University of Liège, Belgium

This conference aims to scrutinize, clarify and elaborate upon the concept of identity, which ranks among the most (ab)used concepts in the humanities since the end of the 20th century.

The popularity of the concept is, first and foremost, to be situated in the aftermath of the linguistic turn, which led to identity being conceived of as the product of discursive interpellations. This theoretical reframing of the subject constitutes the theoretical basis of multiple strands of discourse theory and analysis, and of various types of (post)poststructuralist theory.

The pervasive presence of identity as an object of study is, however, and to an even greater degree, also explained by the postmodern critique of universality and the concomitant deconstruction of the universal subject as a fiction subservient to particular (masculine, white, western, heterosexual…) interests. It is precisely this critique that drives the various forms of progressive identity politics that are so conspicuously present today.

To put it simply and provocatively: where do we go from here? This fundamental question translates into a wide range of more specific questions, such as:

  • Is what (post)structuralism calls the decentred subject a mere passive recipient of discursive interpellations, or does it resist and, if so, in which way(s)? How should this resistance be understood – as an inability or rather as a refusal to accept discursive interpellations? As a rearticulation and ‘slanting’ of a given discourse? As a form of more or less subtle and agile negotiation with hegemonic pressures? As the articulation of a counterhegemonic discourse?
  • How paradoxical and/or ambivalent are identification processes? If a seemingly official and explicit refusal often hides a more fundamental implicit identification (‘I am no racist, but…’) and vice versa (‘We are determined to tackle tax evasion’), how do both levels interact with one another and what audiences are they intended for? How can identificatory acts and utterances be construed as positioning the subject within the conflictual and dialogic contexts from which they emerged?
  • How easy is it to cancel or replace identifications? Have ‘postmodern subjects’ really become fluid and endlessly malleable in a ‘liquid modernity’ (Zygmunt Bauman), or are they tough, inert and persistent? Do they have ‘hard kernels’ and, if so, what would be the nature of these? How important is the impact of discursive sedimentation on individual subjects, cultures and societies? How do deliberate or involuntary cancellations of identifications affect the subject? Are they emancipatory or destructive – or both?
  • Does the postmodern critique of the universal subject not in fact continue to refer to a universal horizon of equality and justice? Should this critique be maintained or should it give way to a dialectical vision of the opposition between the universal and the particular?
  • Are ‘progressive identity politics’ more needed than ever or are they at risk of becoming essentialist and unbearably reductionist stances?
  • Are ‘progressive identity politics’ genuinely progressive or do they allow the researchers involved to view themselves as ‘progressive’? What makes them superior to traditional, conservative identity politics? Do they hamper attempts to unite progressive groups and efforts, uniting only ‘deplorable  antiliberal, reactionary forces, as is argued by such varied authors as Eric Hobsbawm, Terry Eagleton, Slavoj Žižek, Vivek Chibber and Mark Lilla?
  • What are relevant methodological underpinnings of research on identity and identification? Which linguistic means can be observed to index identity (as one of their multiple functions), and how can we classify them meaningfully? For example, how can such phenomena as taboo expressions, metaphors, language varieties (e.g. sociolects and slang), language contact and learner languages enhance our understanding of identity and identification? What about language policy and (official and unofficial) puristic movements?

Proposals will be judged on their ability to address theoretical issues and methodological questions, or the latter’s application to concrete cases and corpora

Since the conference is interdisciplinary in nature, we welcome proposals from the fields of literary studies, linguistics, translation studies, cultural studies, communication studies, political studies, social sciences, philosophy and history.

Abstracts (in English or French) should not exceed 300 words and be submitted along with a brief biobibliographical note (100 words max.) by 1 March 2018 at the latest to the following address: letl@uliege.be. Participants will be notified by 1 May 2018.

Papers may be delivered in Dutch, English, French, German and Spanish, with discussions taking place in English and French.

Organizing committee (ULiège): Kim Andringa, Lieselotte Brems, Louis Gerrekens, Maxim Proesmans, Laurent Rasier, Erik Spinoy, Kris Steyaert, An Van linden, Patricia Willson
External: Ted Laros (Open Universiteit Nederland), Lieven Vandelanotte (UNamur)

Please check www.letl.uliege.be/cms/c_3141291/fr/letl-activites for up-to-date information.

19th International CALL Research Conference

Dear colleagues,

We hereby extend a cordial invitation to submit a proposal for our 19th International CALL Research Conference, which will be held in Bruges (Belgium) from 4 to 6 July 2018. The theme of the conference is CALL your Data.

You are invited to submit a proposal where you describe your past or current research and, more importantly, the challenges encountered and solutions found regarding the “Openness” of the data you make, use of and/or produce. Your submission should consist of a one page abstract (500 words). You should use the template provided. Deadline for submission of abstracts will be January 31st 2018.

Early-bird registration will be 340 EUR. Alex Boulton and Rose Luckin will be our keynote speakers. Updated details on the programme, venue, accommodation, registration and deadlines can be found on the conference website: www.call2018.org.

Looking forward to seeing you in Bruges,

The organizing committee.
Ann Aerts
Jozef Colpaert
Frederik Cornillie
Piet Desmet
Ine Windey

Using Corpora in Contrastive and Translation Studies (5th edition)

The Centre for English Corpus Linguistics of the University of Louvain (UCL) is organizing the fifth edition of the Using Corpora in Contrastive and Translation Studies conference series in Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium) on 12-14 September, 2018.

UCCTS is a biennial international conference which was launched by Richard Xiao in 2008 to provide an international forum for the exploration of the theoretical and practical issues pertaining to the creation and use of corpora in contrastive and translation/interpreting studies. The 2018 edition will be dedicated to the memory of Richard, who initiated the conference series but sadly passed away in January 2016.

After almost 30 years of intensive corpus use in contrastive linguistics and translation studies, the conference aims to take stock of the advances that have been made in methodology, theory, analysis and applications, and think up new ways of moving corpus-based contrastive and translation studies forward. UCCTS2018 is meant to bring together researchers who collect, annotate, analyze corpora and/or use them to inform contrastive linguistics and translation theory and/or develop corpus-informed tools (in foreign language teaching, language testing and quality assessment, translation pedagogy, computer-aided/machine translation or other related NLP domains).

Conference websitehttps://uclouvain.be/en/research-institutes/ilc/cecl/uccts2018.html

The deadline of abstract submission is extended to  January 22nd.

Sylviane Granger & Marie-Aude Lefer

Conference Chairs

CFP: 39th International GERAS Conference

15-17 March 2018

University of Mons, Belgium

Diachronic dimensions in specialised varieties of English:

implications in communications, didactics and translation studies

As a rule, practitioners of English for Specific Purposes show little interest in diachrony and, particularly, in the past of specialised languages. Their main motivation stems from learners’ needs, and needs analyses generally place them in the present or near future rather than in the past. Conversely, a growing number of researchers in continental Europe regard specialised languages as enduring linguistic objects – e.g. specialised varieties of English (SVEs) such as medical or legal English – and exploring these SVEs’ diachronic dimensions plays an increasing part in their scientific interests. This conference invites researchers to examine the diachronic dimensions of specialised English and to explore their various facets.

One first group of questions may bear on the communicational stakes of the subject. Languages aptly serve specialised communication in synchronic conditions, but what are the impacts of diachronic distantiation on comprehension and interpretation? Learners frequently engage in documentary research and they consult texts that may belong in temporal settings lying outside their immediate learning time sphere. Do they have to be made aware of the evolutions in terms, discourse, genres, institutional reference, and of the influence of history on their specialised communities? These questions expand further if the history of SVEs comes into

consideration and if we wonder about their origins. Training learners to become erudite in specialised languages is clearly not an option; yet, totally ignoring the

diachronic dimension of SVEs may not be an adequate posture when it comes to training qualified teachers of English irrespective of their specialised domains.

A second set of questions flows from answers given to the first. If some scientific investment in diachrony makes sense for some SVEs, how can we design

learning/teaching strategies that meet the requirements of the “didactic transposition” put forward by Yves Chevallard (1985: 20)? The aim of the didactic transposition is to produce “knowledge for learners” from “scholars’ knowledge” and the challenge here is to introduce the diachronic dimension into the process. Motivation concerns are also a major issue if learners are invited to devote some time and effort to long-term aspects instead of engaging fully in hic and nunclanguage priorities.

The third group of interrogations concerns translation issues. Culture has long been a major object of research in translation studies (often contrasting “natural” with

“exotic” translations), but diachrony seems to have attracted limited interest. Yet, translators are often challenged by source elements that have changed in the course of time such as terminological evolutions like neologisms or changes in nomenclature; modifications in phraseology resulting from usage or imposed by competent authorities; or paradigmatic changes in the truth conditions of the world, as when one scientific theory is proved wrong and is replaced by another.

In translation studies, source-oriented translation and target-oriented translation only meet part of the translators’ dilemmas when they are confronted with diachrony. The source-oriented translator would simply keep the past elements of the source text and include them in the target text while the target-oriented translator would aim at adapting past elements to make them fit the present. Functionalist translation theories offer better strategies in these cases. Following the

skopos theory, every translation has a purpose. The source text has to be translated so as to make sense for addressees, their knowledge and their needs, in the target circumstances. In this theoretical framework, diachrony-dependent translation decisions are subject to the function of the target text. In that respect, Christiane Nord (1997) stresses that translators have to compare source texts and target texts in terms of addressees and of the medium employed, but also in terms of the place and time of reception. By comparing, translators may make translation decisions which largely determine the target text. Functionalists have duly addressed the issue of time difference between source and target texts, but diachrony is a transversal phenomenon in translation because it is inherent in linguistic evolutions, whether in languages for general or specialised purposes. In that context, it would be of interest to study the evolutions in the translation of neologisms, of theory-constitutive metaphorical terms – their evolutions are often marked by scientific discoveries in the course of time. Other relevant prospective questions may include the translation of specialised phraseologies where parallel corpus analyses highlight diachronic markers.

 

References

Chevallard, Yves. 1985. La transposition didactique : du savoir savant au savoir enseigné. Grenoble: La Pensée Sauvage.

Nord, Christiane. 1997. Translating as a Purposeful Activity: Functionalist Approaches Explained. Manchester, UK: St Jerome.

 

Submission format

Languages: French or English

Number of words: 300

EXTENDED Deadline: 20 January 2018

Forward to: christine.michaux@umons.ac.bem.memet@orange.fr

Site

https://portail.umons.ac.be/FR/universite/admin/cerp/congres_colloques/Pages/15-17mars2018-39%C3%A8meColloqueInternationalduGERAS.aspx

French (construction) morphology meets medieval medical vocabulary

Dear fellow BKL/CBL-members,

We would like to invite you to our workshop French (Construction) Morphology meets medieval medical vocabulary in Leuven on the 16th of March 2018.

This workshop will focus on morphology and Construction Morphology used for lexical analysis, as well as the study of modern and medieval medical terminology. Particularly of interest is the morphological analysis of complex, viz medical, words, namely compounds and derivatives.

Please find more information (program, venue, registration, registration fees…) on our website: https://www.arts.kuleuven.be/chromed/english/workshop-2018/

Regards,

Céline Szecel, on behalf of the organizing committee

Syntactic Variation. A pragmatic view

A Hispanic Linguistics symposium with Scott Schwenter (Ohio State University)

KU Leuven, Friday January 12th 2018.

Faculty of Arts. Blijde Inkomststraat 21, 3000 Leuven. MSI 00.08

10:15 – 11:00 Malte Rosemeyer (KU Leuven) Opening
10:30 – 11:00 Bert Cornillie & Natalia Pericchi (KU Leuven) Indirect object doubling and textual prominence. Evidence from ditransitive dar ‘to give’ in Argentinian Spanish
11:00 – 11:30 Sofía Pérez, Pedro Gras & Frank Brisard (UAntwerpen) Insubordination, polifunctionality and language variation: on insubordinate subjunctive complement constructions in Spanish
11:30 – 12:00 Almudena Basanta & Lieve Vangehuchten (UAntwerpen) Past tenses in CSR discourse from Chile, Mexico and Spain: some useful insights for L2 learners
12:00 – 12:30 Discussion
12:30 – 14:00 Lunch
14:00 – 14:30 Matti Marttinen Larsson (UGent) “Quiero dormir pero el prof está delante mío”: analyzing the morphosyntactic variation between possessive and prepositional complements in Spanish adverbial locatives with Twitter data
14:30 – 15:00 Miriam Bouzouita (UGent) “¿Vos gustas mío? Yo gusto tuyo.” On the use of possessive complements instead of prepositional ones in verbal contexts
15:00 – 16:00 Scott Schwenter (Ohio State University) The role of persistence effects in language variation and change
16:00 – 16:30 Discussion
16.30 – 17.30 Reception

Organizers: Bert Cornillie (KU Leuven) & Malte Rosemeyer (FWO- Vlaanderen – KU Leuven)

Contact and registration: bert.cornillie@kuleuven.be

Experimental Methods in Language Acquisition Research XIV 2018

Lectures and Hands-on Tutorials on Methodological Aspects of Language Acquisition Research, especially designed for PhD students and advanced MA students.

EMLAR 2018 will take place from April 18th until April 20th at the University of Utrecht. Registration is possible until March 31st.

Keynote speaker: Jeffrey Lidz

Invited speakers: Beppie van den Bogaerde, Hans Rutger Bosker, Juliana Gerard, Ileana Grama, Paul Meara, Maria Carmen Parafita-Couto, and Paul Vogt!

Sign up at http://emlar.wp.hum.uu.nl/

Tutorials:

Behavioral Methods in Infant Research| CHILDES | Computational Models | Ethical Decisions in Psycholinguistics | ERP | Eye Tracking: Reading | Eye Tracking: Visual World Paradigm | LENA & Analysis of Spontaneous Speech| LimeSurvey | Multilevel Analysis |New Statistics | PRAAT | SPSS | Statistics with R | Tools for Researching Vocabulary

PhD students are invited to present a poster!

For questions, email emlar2018@uu.nl

Pluralia tantum and other wonders of the number system: a canonical analysis

CRISSP is happy to announce a new CRISSP Seminar with Greville Corbett on Thursday January 18, 2018.

Lecturer: Greville Corbett (University of Surrey)
Title: Pluralia tantum and other wonders of the number system: a canonical analysis
Date & time: Thursday January 18, 2018, 16.00-17.30
Location: KU Leuven, Faculty of Arts, room LETT 02.16
Participation: free


Pluralia tantum and other wonders of the number system: a canonical analysis

Greville Corbett

Pluralia tantum is a label for nouns which lack a singular when, in some sense, they should not. The fact that English binoculars has no singular is worth noting (that is, it is not predictable). True, there are other nouns denoting items consisting of two significant parts which behave similarly (spectacles, trousers, …); indeed they are subject to ‘middle-size generalizations’, (Koenig 1999). But there are two reasons to take note of binoculars and similar nouns. First, there are many English nouns equally denoting items consist- ing of two significant parts which are unremarkable in this respect: bicycle, bigraph, Bactrian camel, cou- ple, duo, …And second, there are languages with number systems roughly comparable to that of English in which the equivalent of binoculars is a normal count noun: Russian binokl’. Conversely, Russian sani ‘sleigh’ is a plurale tantum noun. How then do we talk of ‘one sleigh’ in Russian? These items are the en- try point to a collection of items, some with much stranger behaviour, lurking between the unexpectedly defective and the semi-predictable. Moreover, while pluralia tantum nouns are of continued interest in the general linguistic literature (see, for instance, Wisniewski 1999), it is typically only the English type which is considered. The aim, therefore, is to set out a fuller typology of these fascinating nouns, so that their significance can be more fully appreciated and analyses can be based on a better data set. I start from the notion of canonical noun, and demonstrate the different non-canonical properties according to a set of orthogonal criteria.