CFP: Vocab@Leuven

The third Vocab@ conference will be hosted by KU Leuven from 1 to 3 July 2019.

Previous Vocab@ conferences were held at Meiji Gakuin University in Tokyo in 2016 and Victoria University Wellington in 2013.

The Vocab@Leuven conference aims to bring together researchers from different disciplines who investigate the learning, processing, teaching, and testing of second/foreign language vocabulary.

Confirmed plenary speakers:

Batia Laufer (University of Haifa)
Marc Brysbaert (Ghent University)

Organizing committee:

Elke Peters
Paul Pauwels
Maribel Montero Perez
Eva Puimège
Ann-Sophie Noreillie
Thao Duong

We will invite abstracts for paper and poster presentations about any topic related to second/foreign language vocabulary:

Strands:

– vocabulary teaching (classroom-based research, technology-based, formal/informal learning, …)
– vocabulary assessment
– vocabulary and the skills of reading, listening, TV viewing, writing and speaking
– formulaic language
– corpus approaches to vocabulary
– psycholinguistic approaches to vocabulary
– neurolinguistic approaches to vocabulary
– vocabulary for specialized use (academic, business, technical, etc.)
– vocabulary resources (word lists, dictionaries, …)
– vocabulary and genre/register

Types of presentations will include:
– individual paper (20 + 10 minutes)
– poster

Submission deadline will be: December 15, 2018

Website : https://vocabatleuven.wordpress.com

10th Discourse, Communication and the Enterprise Conference

03-Jun-2019 – 05-Jun-2019, Leuven, Belgium

The DICOEN conference brings together researchers, practitioners and professionals who are interested in discourse and communication in organizational settings. These settings are broadly defined, self-evidently including prototypical businesses and for-profit organizations, but also non-profit organizations, such as legal, governmental and healthcare settings.

Call for Papers:

Research addressing discourse, communication and the role of language in a wide variety of organizational contexts is typically scattered across a range of disciplines. Remaining within the confines of the various scholarly traditions has two major drawbacks. Firstly, it prevents the cross-fertilization of ideas, and prevents research from gaining full momentum. Secondly, it prevents the scholarly developments and research findings to make their way into teaching and training, whether it concerns communication in the professions, business communication or management curricula. Therefore, DICOEN 10 offers an interdisciplinary forum for all those interested in the language-enterprise interface, bringing together a broad range of academic disciplines (including, but not limited to organizational and management studies, discourse analysis, conversation analysis, pragmatics, cognitive linguistics, forensic linguistics, teacher education, communication studies, social psychology, discursive psychology, anthropology), focusing on discourse and communication in a broad range of profit and non-profit organizations.

General Submission Guidelines:

The submission of proposals opens on 1 September 2018. We welcome the submission of proposals for panels and/or individual presentations.
Deadline call for panel proposals: 1 October 2018
Deadline call for papers: 15 November 2018

Panels:

We invite proposals for panels that address a common theme, method or theoretical topic and that bring together at least 3 individual papers. Panel proposals should be no longer than 800 words and should include:

– An overall description explaining the panel’s theme and objectives;
– A list of potential speakers and, if possible, provisional titles of their presentations.

Abstracts for individual papers in the panel (of up to 400 words each) will have to be submitted separately.

Individual paper presentations:

We invite proposals for individual paper presentations of up to 400 words (including references). All panel contributions have to be submitted as individual paper presentations as well, with an indication of the intended panel in which the paper will be presented. The time allotted to oral presentations will be 20 mins + 10 mins for questions and discussion.

The conference policy is  »one main oral presentation per author ». One may at the same time also be a panel organizer or a co-author of other oral presentations. It is important to note that the first author of each presentation always has to be (co-)presenting and thus has to be registered in order for the presentation to be included in the conference program.

Please see: https://www.arts.kuleuven.be/ling/dicoen2019/call

BCGL11: The syntax and semantics of aspect

Brussels, December 10-11, 2018.

The Center for Research in Syntax, Semantics and Phonology (CRISSP) of KU Leuven invites abstracts for the 11th edition of the Brussels Conference on Generative Linguistics (BCGL 11) devoted to the syntax and semantics of aspect.

Workshop description

The purpose of the conference is to discuss and explore the syntax and semantics of aspect, including the interface between those two, as well as cross-linguistic variation within these domains.

The properties and representations of aspect have been studied extensively from both syntactic and semantic perspectives, as well as their interfaces.

As for the syntax, a central question is how aspectual notions such as telicity, duration, cause and change are represented in syntax. Approaches range from the minimalist structure of Erteschik-shir & Rapoport (2005), to a more fine-grained functional structure as proposed by Ramchand (2008), or with a clear differentiation between outer (external, presentational) and inner (internal, Aktionsart) aspect, as proposed by Travis (2010). More detailed studies of aspect have investigated, for example, the different types of perfect, such as universal, experiental, resultative and existential perfect (e.g. Pancheva 2003). Another relevant question is the distinction between morphological and periphrastic means to express aspectual distinctions. Both the more general and the more detailed studies raise the question of the division of labour between the syntax and the semantics (Ramchand 2008), i.e. on what is contributed by the (extended) syntactic structure of the verb carrying aspectual information, other elements in the syntactic structure, and the lexical semantics of the verb.

The semantics of aspect has also been widely studied. As in the syntax, a distinction is often made between outer and inner aspect, with tense scoping over grammatical (outer) aspect, and grammatical aspect scoping over aspectual class (inner aspect). This layered structure makes it possible to investigate (crosslinguistic variation in) the interaction between the lexical features of the verb, the semantics of the predicate-argument structure, the expression of progressive and perfective/imperfective aspect, and other elements in the sentence which can carry aspectual information (e.g. certain adverbs/adverbial phrases, negation). In this respect, questions arise about the nature of the interaction between perfectivity and telicity, or between tense and aspect (De Swart 2012). A second question concerns the exact setup of the different layers contributing to aspect (cf. Verkuyl 1999; Travis 2000, 2010; Ritter & Rosen 2005; Ramchand 2008). There is also debate about whether grammatical aspect and aspectual class are semantically interpreted by different mechanisms (Smith 1991/1997; Depraetere 1995; Filip 1999; Bertinetto & Delfitto 2000) or by the same ones (Moens & Steedman 1988; Parsons 1990; Kamp & Reyle 1993; De Swart 1998; Verkuyl 1999; Cipria & Roberts 2000). More specific questions to be addressed at the conference include, but are not limited to, the following:

Syntax:

• What are the limits of variation in the expression of aspect? If we assume flexibility in size of and order within the aspectual layer, how much flexibility is there?

• How do languages grammaticalise verbal aspect? What is the range of the variation

observed? Do the present distinctions of grammatical categories suffice?

• Periphrastic constructions are usually included in the category of progressives ‘if they display a medium-to-high degree of grammaticalization and routinization’ (Mair 2012: 804). Can this criterion be grounded in an objective measure of grammaticalisation?

Semantics:

• What kinds of interaction of tense/aspect with non-truth-conditional meaning are possible (e.g., presuppositional imperfective in Russian, cf. Grønn 2004, Borik & Gehrke 2018)?

• How can we formalise anaphoric/referential aspect (Grønn 2004, Grønn & von Stechow 2016, Demirdache & Uribe-Etxebarria 2014)?

• Do the different types of syntactic realisations of aspect have different semantics?

• What kind of semantic mismatches are possible and how can we encode them? (e.g., the present perfect puzzle; Klein 1995)

Syntax-semantics interface:

• What is the division of labour between syntax and semantics, and how much crosslinguistic variation is there with relation to this division of labour?

Invited speakers

• Berit Gehrke (Humboldt Universität, Berlin)

• Roumyana Pancheva (University of Southern California)

• Gillian Ramchand (The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø)

Abstract guidelines

Abstracts should not exceed two pages, including data, references and diagrams. Abstracts should be typed in at least 11-point font, with one-inch margins (letter-size; 8½ inch by 11 inch or A4) and a maximum of 50 lines of text per page. Abstracts must be anonymous and submissions are limited to 2 per author, at least one of which is co-authored. Only electronic submissions will be accepted. Please submit your abstract using the EasyChair link for BCGL11: https://easychair.org/conferences/?conf=bcgl11

Important dates

• First call for papers: June 1, 2018

• Second call for papers: August 16, 2018

• Abstract submission deadline: September 15, 2018

• Notification of acceptance: October 16, 2018

• Conference: December 10-11, 2018

Conference location

CRISSP – KU Leuven Brussels Campus
Stormstraat 2
1000 Brussels
Belgium

Using Corpora in Contrastive and Translation Studies (5th edition)

The Centre for English Corpus Linguistics of the University of Louvain (UCL) is organizing the fifth edition of the Using Corpora in Contrastive and Translation Studies conference series in Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium) on 12-14 September, 2018.

UCCTS is a biennial international conference which was launched by Richard Xiao in 2008 to provide an international forum for the exploration of the theoretical and practical issues pertaining to the creation and use of corpora in contrastive and translation/interpreting studies. The 2018 edition will be dedicated to the memory of Richard, who initiated the conference series but sadly passed away in January 2016.

After almost 30 years of intensive corpus use in contrastive linguistics and translation studies, the conference aims to take stock of the advances that have been made in methodology, theory, analysis and applications, and think up new ways of moving corpus-based contrastive and translation studies forward. UCCTS2018 is meant to bring together researchers who collect, annotate, analyze corpora and/or use them to inform contrastive linguistics and translation theory and/or develop corpus-informed tools (in foreign language teaching, language testing and quality assessment, translation pedagogy, computer-aided/machine translation or other related NLP domains).

Detailed information about the conference (including the list of presentations) can be found on the conference website:https://uclouvain.be/en/research-institutes/ilc/cecl/uccts2018.html

The deadline of abstract submission is extended to  January 22nd.

Keynote speakers

  • Gloria Corpas Pastor (University of Malaga): “In principio erat verbum: A fresh look at corpora for translation and interpreting”
  • Sandra Halverson (Western Norway University of Applied Sciences): “Cognitive translation studies and the combination of data types and methods”
  • Hilde Hasselgård (University of Oslo): “Corpus-based contrastive studies: beginnings, developments and directions”
  • Juliane House (University of Hamburg): “Using corpora for evaluating translations and language change”
  • Haidee Kruger (Macquarie University): “Expanding the third code: Corpus-based studies of constrained communication and language mediation”

Note that participation in the conference is limited by the venue, so we recommend that you register as soon as possible.

Sylviane Granger & Marie-Aude Lefer
UCCTS 2018 Conference Chairs

CMC and Social Media Corpora 2018

17-Sep-2018 – 18-Sep-2018, Antwerp, Belgium

‘CMC-corpora 2018’ is the 6th edition of an annual conference series dedicated to the collection, annotation, processing and exploitation of corpora of computer-mediated communication (CMC) and social media. The conference brings together language-centered research on CMC and social media in linguistics, philologies, communication sciences, media and social sciences with research questions from the fields of corpus and computational linguistics, sociolinguistics, language technology, text technology, and machine learning.

2nd Call for Papers:

We invite submissions for talks and for posters or software/corpus demonstrations on any topic relevant to the list of themes (below). Contributions should be anonymized and submitted via the online conference system, and will be peer-reviewed by the scientific committee. (Visit the online submission link)

For talks, we request short papers (2-4 pages) in English. Authors of accepted papers can present their work at the conference in a 20 minute talk followed by 10 minutes for questions and discussion. Accepted short papers will be published in online proceedings before the conference. After the conference, there will be an open call for extended papers to be published in a special issue of European Journal of Applied Linguistics (EuJAL), to appear in 2019.

For poster presentations (reserved for early stage research) or software/corpus demonstrations, we request abstracts in English (max. 500 words, bibliographical references not included). Authors of accepted abstracts can present their poster and/or give their demonstration during the poster session, which will be opened by one-minute ‘teaser talks’. Accepted abstracts will be printed in the book of abstracts.

All information on the call for papers (deadlines, topics, guidelines) are on the website:
https://www.uantwerpen.be/en/conferences/cmc-social-media-2018/call-for-papers/

International Conference Languaging Diversity 2018

THU 27 SEPT – SAT 29 SEPTEMBER 2018, ANTWERP

Following the four successful events hosted by the Universities of Naples (2013), Catania (2014), Macerata (2016) and Cagliari (2017) where topics such as diversity, alterity, power and social class have been explored with reference to gender, ethnicity and culture, we bring the Languaging Diversity Conference outside of Italy and into Belgium. The theme of the conference this year is discourse and diversity in the global city.

Conference theme: Discourse and Diversity in the Global City

Discourses in/of/about the city vibrantly conceptualize, narrate and imagine the past, present and future of a city and its citizens. The city’s status, character, spirit and image are constantly imagined, reproduced and framed in private and public communication. In urban discourse languages, identities and subcultures meet, as old and new inhabitants interact with temporary visitors and guests. Accordingly, alternative city images may arise, as existing discourse representations of cities are recontextualized and transformed in other visions about the city and citizenship. This process implies utopian or dystopian views on the city, as discourse zooms in on challenges, problems and possible solutions over time. Discourse as such displays different social actors evolving around urban life, which gives an insight into to attitudes, opinions and sentiments about the city. In global cities, social experience, spaces and activities are lived through the linguascape of complex multilingual, multisensory and multimodal repertoires, as citizens’ identities and (absence of) interactions cross borders which connect different languages, time, space and semiotic modes.

This conference brings together interdisciplinary research about discourse(s) in global cities, and wishes to analyze and discuss commonalities and distinctiveness between urban areas, conceived of as networks of spatial and symbolic nodal points and peripheral zones. The interdisciplinary focus looks for discussions and connections which involve the broad field of discourse studies and correlated issues, including but not limited to

  • Sociolinguistics of globalization
  • Politics, communication policy and governance
  • Mobility, migration, circulation, tourism
  • Cultural spaces, capitals of culture
  • Imagined cities
  • Social, economic and technological aspects of global cities (smart cities, the future internet, digital cities)
  • City marketing and city branding
  • Sustainable cities
  • Privacy and public safety, (transnational) crime fighting
  • Community building, community involvement and ghettoisation
  • Cultural mediation and multilingualism

The following macro-areas and/or methodological approaches are to be understood as a general guideline and can be further extended:

  • Critical Discourse Analysis, Critical Discourse Studies
  • Socio-cognition  and Systemic Functional Linguistics
  • Linguistic anthropology
  • Corpus-based discourse studies
  • Language crossing, switching, and mixing
  • Language variation and language change
  • Multimodal, digital and audio-visual discourse(s)
  • Contrastive Pragmatics
  • Sociolinguistics, sociolinguistics of globalization
  • Ethnographic approaches to language
  • Literary studies
  • Translation Studies
  • Cultural Studies
  • Media Studies
  • Documentary and Film Studies
  • History of ideas
Call for papers
We welcome individual presentations and posters, which will be submitted to anonymous review. Proposals for thematically organized sessions can be proposed to the organizers, with a short rationale for the session in the conference format. This proposal should contain a list with speakers and titles. All papers in the session need to be submitted through the general review process.
Important dates
Proposals for theme sessions: 15 April 2018.
Approval theme sessions: 20 April 2018.
New extended call deadline: Individual abstracts (including papers in sessions) should be submitted by 15 May 2018.
Approval papers: 1 June 2018.Early bird registration: before 10 August 2018.
Late registration: before 10 September 2018.

Third International Conference on Language Education and Testing

November 26-28, 2018, Antwerp, Belgium

Dear colleague,

We hereby extend a cordial invitation to submit a proposal to our Third International Conference on Language Education and Testing, which will be held at Antwerp University (Belgium), from 26 to 28 November 2018. The theme of this year’s conference is “Language Education and Emotions”. Its aim is to bring together scholars from all over the world to share their interest in the role and place of emotions in language learning and teaching.

As a researcher, practitioner or policy maker, you can attest to the close connection between language education and emotions, both in learners and teachers. These affective factors influence their perceptions and behavior, and finally also the learning outcomes.

Research into the influence of emotions in language education is not new, but is still evolving. The conference will provide an overview of the scientific status quo in the field of Language Education and Emotions. Secondly, it will identify the challenges our research is confronted with. This will allow us to build a research agenda for the future.

“Language Education and Emotions” will address a wide range of topics relating to affective factors in language learning, centering on:

  • Emotions and the Language Learner: e.g. foreign language anxiety, self-esteem, motivation, willingness to communicate, inhibition, autonomy
  • Emotions and the Language Teacher: e.g. self-efficacy, motivation, empathy
  • Emotions and the Teaching and Learning Process: e.g. language teaching methods, approaches in language teaching, learning materials/ tools, CALL, evaluation

Please, submit your proposal before June 1st, 2018 on the conference website: http://www.uantwerpen.be/en/conferences/language-education-and-emotions/

The keynote speakers at the conference are:

– Jane Arnold Morgan (University of Seville; author of Affect in Language Learning);
– Jean-Marc Dewaele (Birkbeck, University of London; author of Emotions in Multiple Languages);
– One paper will be selected as plenary presentation.

We hope you will be able to join us and our plenary speakers, and look forward to welcoming you in Antwerp in November!

On behalf of the organizing committee,

Mathea Simons
Tom Smits

Conference on Multilingualism (COM) 2018

16th – 18th December 2018

The Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences (FPPW) at Ghent University is organising the Conference on Multilingualism 2018. The conference will take place from Sunday 16th to Tuesday 18th December 2018 in the historic city of Ghent, Belgium. The call for oral and poster presentations will open soon.

The Conference on Multilingualism actually has a longstanding tradition. It started in 2005 at the University of Trento under the name ‘Workshop on Bilingualism’. Since then, the name has been changed a couple of times to ‘Neurobilingualism’ and ‘Workshop of Neurobilingualism’. In 2016, it was decided to continue the conference under the somewhat broader label of ‘Conference on multilingualism’ (COM) in order to include different aspects of multilingualism. COM was subsequently held in Ghent (2016) and Groningen (2017), and is this year coming to Ghent once again.

Although the official call is coming soon, participants wishing to host a symposium may already contact us at com2018@ugent.be. Suitable topics are all aspects of multilingualism in the fields of linguistics, psychology, neurology, sociology, and educational sciences.

Organising Committee:
Marc Brysbaert, Wouter Duyck, June Eyckmans, Robert Hartsuiker, Evy Woumans (Ghent University)
Sarah Bernolet (University of Antwerp)
Esli Struys (Free University of Brussels)
Arnaud Szmalec (Universit? Catholique de Louvain)
Eline Zenner (Katholieke Universiteit Leuven)

Location: Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences, Henri Dunantlaan 2, 9000 Ghent – Belgium

Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing (EMNLP)

Main conference

SIGDAT, the Association for Computational Linguistics’ Special Interest Group on linguistic data and corpus-based approaches to NLP, invites you to submit your papers to EMNLP 2018 (November 2 – November 4, 2018) in Brussels, Belgium.

We invite the submission of long and short papers related to empirical methods in natural language processing. Accepted papers will be presented as oral talks or posters. As in recent years, the conference will also include presentations of selected papers accepted by the Transactions of the ACL.

Topics

We solicit papers on all areas of interest to the SIGDAT community and aligned fields, including but not limited to:

Language Models, Segmentation
Morphological Analysis, POS Tagging and Sequence Labeling
Syntactic and Semantic Parsing
Lexical and Compositional Semantics
Discourse and Coreference
Dialogue and Interactive Systems
Narrative Understanding and Commonsense Reasoning
Spoken Language Processing
Text Mining
Sentiment Analysis and Opinion Mining
Information Retrieval, Question Answering
Information Extraction
Summarization
Natural Language Generation
Machine Translation
Multilinguality and Cross-linguality
Linguistic Theories and Resources
Computational Psycholinguistics
Multimodal and Grounded Language Processing
Machine Learning for NLP
Web, Social Media and Computational Social Science
Ethics and Fairness in NLP
Other NLP Applications

Important Dates

Submissions due (long & short) Tuesday May 22, 2018
Author response period starts Friday July 6, 2018
Author rebuttals due Thursday July 12, 2018
Notification of acceptance Monday August 6, 2018
Camera-ready due Monday August 27, 2018
Workshops & tutorials Wednesday – Thursday October 31 – November 1, 2018
Main conference Friday – Sunday November 2 – November 4, 2018
Note: All deadlines are calculated at 11:59pm Pacific Daylight Savings Time (UTC -7h).

Conference website : http://emnlp2018.org/

Workshops & Co-located Events

Dates and locations for each workshop will be added soon. Please refer to each individual event’s website for more details.

CoNLL: The Conference on Computational Natural Language Learning

CoNLL is a top-tier conference, yearly organized by SIGNLL (ACL’s Special Interest Group on Natural Language Learning).

WMT18: The Third Conference on Machine Translation

The WMT18 conference builds on a series of annual workshops and conferences on statistical machine translation, going back to 2006.

LOUHI: The Ninth International Workshop on Health Text Mining and Information Analysis

LOUHI 2018 provides an interdisciplinary forum for researchers interested in automated processing of health documents.

BioASQ: Large-scale biomedical semantic indexing and question answering

The aim of the BioASQ workshop is to push the research frontier towards systems that use the diverse and voluminous information available online to respond directly to the information needs of biomedical scientists.

Analyzing and Interpreting Neural Networks for NLP

The goal of this workshop is to bring together people who are attempting to peek inside the neural network black box, taking inspiration from machine learning, psychology, linguistics and neuroscience.

FEVER: First Workshop on Fact Extraction and VERification

The FEVER workshop brings together researchers working on various tasks related to fact extraction and verification and also hosts the FEVER Challenge, an information verification shared task.

ARGMINING: 5th International Workshop on Argument Mining

The goal of the ArgMining workshop is to provide a continuing forum to the last four years’ Argumentation Mining workshops at ACL and NAACL, the first research forum devoted to argumentation mining in all domains of discourse.

ALW2: Second Workshop on Abusive Language Online

The last few years have seen a surge in abusive online behavior, with governments, social media platforms, and individuals struggling to cope with the consequences and to produce effective methods to combat it. The ALW2 workshop bring researchers of various disciplines together to discuss approaches to abusive language.

W-NUT: 4th Workshop on Noisy User-generated Text

The WNUT workshop focuses on Natural Language Processing applied to noisy user-generated text, such as that found in social media, online reviews, crowdsourced data, web forums, clinical records and language learner essays.

SCAI: Search-Oriented Conversational AI

The SCAI workshop aims to bring together AI/Deep Learning specialists on one hand and search/IR specialists on the other hand to lay the ground for search-oriented conversational AI and establish future directions and collaborations.

UDW: Second Workshop on Universal Dependencies

The Universal Dependencies Workshop invites papers on all topics relevant to universal dependencies. Priority will be given to papers that adopt a cross-lingual perspective.

SIGMORPHON: Fifteenth Workshop on Computational Research in Phonetics, Phonology, and Morphology

This workshop organized by the ACL Special Interest Group on Computational Morphology and Phonology provides a forum for exchanging news of recent research developments and other matters of interest in computational morphology and phonology.

WASSA: 9th Workshop on Computational Approaches to Subjectivity, Sentiment and Social Media Analysis

The aim of the WASSA workshop is to continue the line of the previous editions, bringing together researchers in Computational Linguistics working on Subjectivity and Sentiment Analysis and researchers working on interdisciplinary aspects of affect computation from text.

SMM4H: 3rd Social Media Mining for Health Applications Workshop & Shared Task

The SMM4H workshop seeks to attract researchers interested in automatic methods for the collection, extraction, representation, analysis, and validation of social media data for health informatics. It serves as a unique forum to discuss novel approaches to text and data mining methods that are applicable to social media data and may prove invaluable for health monitoring and surveillance.

Annual conference of the ‘Belgian Association of Anglicists in Higher Education’ on Intensity

30-Nov-2018 – 30-Nov-2018, Mons, Belgium

At first sight, intensity is a clear, readily understandable notion, yet it evokes a wide array of interpretations and can be linked with a high semantic-pragmatic, syntactic and stylistic complexity. Intensity, understood here very broadly as the quality to deviate from neutrality, pervades and shapes our daily life, our actions and our language. Intensity permeates language at all linguistic levels, allowing us to encode emotional attitude – from subtle nuances to very strong emotions – or to increase or attenuate the (emotional) impact of our utterances. As Partington (1993: 178) said in relation to intensification, its importance lies in “that it is a vehicle for impressing, praising, persuading, insulting and generally influencing the listener’s reception of the message”. As a pervasive concept, omnipresent in language, intensity allows for a wide variety of approaches from each of the fields brought together by BAAHE, literature, cultural studies, linguistics, translation studies and ELT.

Invited speaker: Belén Méndez-Naya (Universidad de Santiago de Compostela)

Call for Papers:
In linguistics, intensity is most obviously represented in studies of intensification and (inter)subjectivity/-ation, politeness, and modality. Intensity has also been under scrutiny in sign language studies. Almost 40 years ago, Klima & Bellugi (1979) studied the morphological marking of intensification in ASL. More recently, intensity has been studied as the expression of emotion through technological means such as the use of emoticons and Internet slang. In addition, intensity is a prominent concept in metaphor studies, with INTENSITY IS HEAT being one of the most central metaphors (Kövecses 2005). As indicating an increase or decrease in the salience of or attention on a linguistic entity, intensity is also related to topic and focus markers and, in phonology, is understood to refer to pitch accent and stress. (Multimodal) studies on paralinguistic features accompanying intensity such as prosodic peaks and gestures also provide interesting avenues of research.

In translation studies, intensity can be an equally rich field of study. How do translators convey emotions and intensity in the target language? Do they necessarily resort to explicitation? Cultural and language-system related differences might also play a role here. How can we compare intensity across cultures? Is intensity categorized differently across cultures? How do cross-cultural differences influence the translation process or result? When translating intensity does the translator (succeed to) take into account  »the effusiveness of Italian, the formality and stiffness of German and Russian, the impersonality of French » compared to  »the informality and understatement of English » (Newmark 1988:5)?
Intensity is crucial from an ELT perspective as well, with intensification being  »an important and, beyond the elementary level, intricate part of foreign language learning » (Lorenz 1999:26). Whether acquiring the ability to express complex communicative intentions, the ability to use appropriate registers or the idiomatic use of adverbs with adjectives, learners are faced with intensity throughout their learning process.

In literature, both in fiction and non-fiction, intensity most often refers to the authenticity or appropriateness of emotional discourse. From passionate outbursts to pent-up emotions, literature abounds with instances of epideictic discourse or appeal to pathos. Throughout history, literary traditions have sought to unleash or restrain the intensity of emotional material. Most typically, the shift from classicism to Romanticism embodies a move from ethos to pathos, from emphasis on design and structure to the intensity Keats came to praise as  »the excellence of every art » (Hilfer 1981:7).

Please submit your anonymized proposal (400 words, excluding references) to lobke.ghesquiereumons.ac.be. Authors can submit a maximum of two abstracts if at least one of these is co-authored.

Accepted papers will be allocated 20 min. + 10 min. for discussion.
Notification of acceptance: 20 July 2018