27th Conference of the European Association for Computer Assisted Language Learning

28-31 August 2019, Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium

First call for papers – EUROCALL 2019

We are very happy to announce that the 27th EUROCALL conference will be hosted by UCLouvain – in collaboration with KU Leuven – in Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium), from Wednesday 28 to Saturday 31 August 2019.
www.eurocall2019.be

The 2019 conference theme is CALL and complexity. We will collectively embrace the challenges expressed through the theme: the complexities of languages as such, the complexities of learning and teaching languages, and the added complexity that comes with doing so in technology-mediated contexts. We look forward to discussing all of these with the EUROCALL community!

Key thematic strands include:

CALL for social inclusion
CMC and telecollaboration
Corpora and language learning
Digital bi- and multi-literacies
Intelligent CALL (ICALL)
Mobile assisted language learning (MALL)
Natural language processing applications in CALL
Open Educational Resources and practices (incl. LMOOC)
Research trends in CALL
SLA principles in CALL
Task complexity in CALL
Teacher education and professional development in CALL
The complexity, accuracy, fluency (CAF) framework of proficiency in CALL (research and applications)
Virtual Reality and gamification in language learning

We welcome proposals from researchers and practitioners working in CALL in any areas relevant – but not restricted to – the proposed conference thematic strands. The conference language is English and all proposals for Papers, Symposia, European Projects, Workshops and Posters should ideally be submitted in English.

Important Dates

Call for papers Announcement starts November 2018
Submissions open December 2018
Submissions due 15 February 2019
Notification of acceptance 15 April 2019
Registration Online registration opens February/March 2019
Deadline for early-bird registration 15 May 2019
Deadline for presenters 01 June 2019
Deadline for normal registration 31 July 2019
Late registration starts 01 August 2019
Conference Preliminary programme online June 2019
Full programme online July 2019
Main conference 28-31 August 2019

Presentation categories include

  1. Individual papers

Papers should be submitted for 30-minute presentations. This timing allows for 20 minutes presenting, 5 minutes for questions, and 5 minutes for room changes.

Three types of papers may be given:

Research: papers focusing on a clearly specified research topic supported by a rationale, including a brief literature review. The thrust may be empirical or theoretical. The methodology should be clearly outlined as well as the actual or potential findings.

Research and Development: papers focusing on the development of pedagogies, programmes and projects in technology-rich environments. The research should be original and may emphasise practice rather than research.

Reflective Practice: practice-oriented papers dealing with the integration of technologies in different contexts and for different purposes. The reflection could take the form of evaluation or action-research. Proposals should include elements that are of relevance beyond the context of the practice described

  1. Symposia

Symposia consist of three or four papers on a similar topic, proposed and organised by a chairperson, and should normally address the conference theme. Sessions last for 90 minutes, with NO changeover during the symposium. The proposal should outline the purpose of the symposium, the names and institutions of the participants, with a sentence mentioning what aspect of the main problem that each will address.
Submissions for symposia from EUROCALL SIGs are particularly welcome, with a view to promoting their work to the conference delegates and encouraging participation in the SIGs. Current EUROCALL SIGs are: Teacher Education, Virtual Worlds and Serious Gaming, iCALL, CorpusCall, Computer Mediated Communication, Less-widely Taught Languages, Mobile-Assisted Language Learning, Graduate Students, LMOOC.

  1. European Projects

This year’s conference will again offer a forum for the showcasting and dissemination of EU-funded projects. Each project will be allocated a 30-minute slot, including questions.

  1. Posters

Since posters aim to attract attention to a particular project or research domain, they should mainly focus on work in progress. They may, however, report previous or preliminary findings. Posters should be clear, easy to read and attractively laid out. Submissions from advanced students are especially welcome in this category. A prize will be awarded for the best poster in two categories: PhD/Graduate student and Researcher.

  1. Pre-conference workshops

A limited number of pre-conference workshops will be organized on Wednesday 28 August in the morning. They can either last for 90 minutes or 3 hours. They typically involve a hands-on session, where participants have the opportunity to become familiar with the latest developments in relevant topic areas in language teaching and learning and tools associated with these. The proposal should include the intended duration of the workshop, its main purpose, and a brief outline of topics and activities covered, as well as technical requirements.

Format of abstracts

All presentation categories require the submission of an abstract that does not exceed 500 words, excluding the title, names and affiliations. You will have to select from a list of conference subthemes when submitting your abstract (submissions will be possible round mid-December), which will hopefully help us organize the programme around various thematic strands. You will also be asked to provide 3 or 4 keywords.

How to submit your proposal

The submission platform will be open round mid-December and detailed information will be included in the second call for papers.

Contact information

Any queries relating to the conference should be sent to eurocall2019@uclouvain.be

On behalf of the EUROCALL 2019 organizing team

Fanny Meunier (CECL, UCLouvain)
Conference Chair

Serge Bibauw (ITEC, KU Leuven & CENTAL, UCLouvain)
Frederik Cornillie (ITEC, KU Leuven)
Sylvie De Cock (CECL, UCLouvain & Université Saint-Louis)
Piet Desmet (ITEC, KU Leuven)
Cédrick Fairon (CENTAL, UCLouvain)
Thomas François (CENTAL, UCLouvain)
Germain Simons (Université de Liège)
Anaïs Tack (CENTAL, UCLouvain & ITEC, KU Leuven)
Julie Van de Vyver (CECL, UCLouvain)

International Workshop on the L1 and L2 Acquisition of Information Structure

25-26 April 2019, Leuven, Belgium

The aim of this workshop is to gather researchers working on different aspects of the L1 and L2 acquisition of Information Structure in different languages, using experimental protocols or corpus research, to gain a better understanding of the development of Information Structure.

Call for Papers:

In recent years, the study of Information Structure in child language has gained significant interest. Studies show that the accessibility level of referents influences children’s referential choices (Hendriks, Koster, & Hoeks, 2014; Hickmann & Hendriks, 1999) or word order (Narasimhan & Dimroth, 2008, 2018; Stephens, 2010; Schelletter and Leinonen; 2003). Children’s prosodic and syntactic choices to encode the topic and focus have also been studied in some detail (Arnhold, Chen, & Järvikivi, 2016; Chen, 2011; De Cat, 2009).

While some studies suggest that morphology and syntax are acquired before pragmatics and Information Structure (Schaeffer & Matthewson, 2005), others show that some of children’s constructions encode an adult-like Information Structure configuration: French and Italian children use dislocations to encode the topic of the utterance from the start(Belleti and Manetti, 2018; De Cat, 2007, 2009).

Children do not develop all aspects of Information Structure at the same rate. Dutch children acquire the intonation contour to mark topic before the contour for focus (Chen, 2011), and Portuguese children acquire the syntactic marking of focus while they still struggle with the computations required to interpret stress shift as a focus marker (Costa and Szendrői, 2006). Besides, research suggests that the comprehension of focus-marking intonation is acquired after production in child language (Szendrői, 2004; Gualmini et al., 2003; Paterson et al., 2003, but see Szendrői et al., 2018; Chen, 2010 for a different point of view).

The study of L2 acquisition of Information Structure has also developed recently (Colonna et al., 2018; Park, 2018 among others), and reevaluates former findings. According to Fuller and Gundel (1987), the interlanguage of L2 learners is characterized by an early topic-prominent stage and a late subject-prominent stage, but recent research however suggests a transfer from L1 characteristics (Jin, 1994; Jung, 2004). Some authors consider that L2 learners have difficulties acquiring the syntax-pragmatic and Information Structure interface (Sorace & Filiaci, 2006; Alvaro, 2018). Some find that L2 learners, as they become more advanced, manage to acquire syntactic constructions with the appropriate Information Structure function (Reichle and Birdsong, 2013; Hughes, 2010; Dominguez and Arche, 2010; Donaldson, 2011a, 2011b)

The questions which can be addressed include, but are not restricted to:

– Which prosodic, morphologic or syntactic means are used by children to encode Information Structure? What is the developmental pattern of these means?
– Are some means to encode Information Structure (prosody vs syntax) acquired earlier than others?
– How does the division of labor between syntax/prosody and Information Structure in the target language impact on its acquisition?
– Are some aspects of Information Structure (referential vs. relational) easier to acquire by children?
– Are there early stages in L1 or L2 language development exhibiting more topic-prominent or subject-prominent characteristics?
– Which aspects of Information Structure are acquired in production before comprehension?

We invite you to submit proposals for 20-minute individual presentations. Abstracts should not exceed two pages in length, 12-point type, Times New Roman, single line spacing, 2.5cm (1 inch) margins, including examples and tables.

Abstracts should be submitted in PDF format via EasyChair: https://easychair.org/conferences/?conf=ais2019

Conference Website:

https://www.arts.kuleuven.be/ling/is-acquisition/AIS2019

Keynote Speakers:

Aoju Chen (Utrecht Institute of Linguistics)
Carla Soares (Université Paris VIII)
Maria Lobo (Universidade Nova de Lisboa)
Kriszta Szendrői (University College London)

The Syntagmatic Properties of Complementation Patterns: Accommodating Lexical and Grammatical uses of CTP-clauses

09-10 May 2019, Liège, Belgium

Recently, much attention has gone to lexical versus grammatical uses of complement-taking predicate (CTP) clauses (Boye & Harder 2007, 2012; Davidse et al. 2015; Van linden et al. 2016). Concomitant with this, the question has been raised whether these two uses should receive a different structural analysis. Complement clauses of lexical uses have been analysed as subordinate to the CTP-clause. In (1), e.g., the that-clause is typically analysed as the direct object of the main verb; in (4), the that-clause is traditionally analysed as an extraposed subject clause (cf. Quirk et al. 1985: 1224–1225; Huddleston and Pullum 2002: 1252–1254). Semantically, the complement clauses in (1) and (4) are viewed as only secondary. What is discursively primary is the specific emotional state conveyed by the CTP-clauses. The that-clauses represent the proposition presupposed in the processes of regretting (1) and feeling wonder (4) (Van linden et al. 2016).

(1) This was Rosie at her most Rosieish, and Liz only regretted that Pritch wasn’t there to appreciate just what she was up against. (WB)
(2) He spoke out after pro-Agreement parties were presented with the proposals. “I think it is clear that all of the issues have to be addressed,” he said. (WB)
(3) Alain Prost proved you can take time out and make a great comeback when he won his fourth world crown […]. There is no doubt the constant testing and pressure of racing takes a hell of a lot out of you. (WB)
(4) My kids got to see that my out-of-home life was far more complex and intense than they thought. It was a wonder to them that I get to do all this stuff. (IC)

While syntagmatically lexical uses of CTP-clauses are viewed as having ‘complementizing’ status, grammatical uses (2)-(3) are argued to show ‘modifying’ status (Boye & Harder 2007: 568), as the CTP cannot impose its semantic profile on the complement clause (cf. Langacker 1987: 309). The complement clauses contain the main information, and the main clauses are viewed as stance markers or interpersonal modifiers (McGregor 1997: 236). That is, (3) does not describe an act of not doubting. Rather, the impersonal CTP-clause there’s no doubt expresses the speaker’s epistemic stance towards the proposition coded by the that-clause; it signals a high degree of certainty (Davidse et al. 2015: 51). In (2), the personal CTP-clause I think functions as a speech act modifier, hedging the claim in the complement clause (cf. Nuyts 2009: 152). Both CTP-clauses are not part of what is asserted and hence cannot be challenged (Boye & Harder 2007: 573).

This workshop aims to focus on functional approaches towards complementation patterns, and invites contributions discussing the following questions:

– What makes CTP-clauses prone to shift from complementizing to modifying uses? Which semantic types of complement construction (e.g. factive constructions?) do not allow for this shift?
– Does the formal type of complement bear on the possibility of the CTP-clause to have either complementizing or modifying status?
– Does the semantic type of complement (e.g. State of Affairs vs. proposition) bear on the possibility of the CTP-clause to have either complementizing or modifying status?
– Do complement constructions with impersonal matrices (like (3)-(4)) manifest the same structural and functional parameters and shifts as personal CTP-clauses (2)?
– Do lexical uses of CTP-clauses always diachronically precede grammatical uses?
– What does prosody tell us about syntagmatic relationships?

Invited speakers: Kasper Boye (University of Copenhagen), Gunther Kaltenböck (University of Graz) and William McGregor (Aarhus University)
Organizers: An Van linden (Liège), Lieselotte Brems (Liège), Kristin Davidse (Leuven), Lieven Vandelanotte (Namur)

Call for Papers:

We invite 500-word abstracts addressing any of the above issues or related questions, for 20 minute-presentations (+ 10′ discussion time). Abstracts should be submitted to an.vanlinden@uliege.be, and should contain title, author’s name and affiliation.

Deadline: 20 December 2018
Notification: 15 February 2019

Discourse Perspectives on Technical Communication

03 Jun 2019 – 05 Jun-2019
Leuven, Belgium

The overarching aim of this panel session of DICOEN 2019 is to advance interdisciplinary research in the field of technical communication. More specifically, this session aims to bring together researchers, practitioners and professionals with an interest in discourse aspects of technical communication, addressing the role of language-in-use and the way in which language is embedded in technical communication settings. Unlike other institutional contexts such as politics, the media, the workplace, healthcare etc. (for other “real-world contexts”, see e.g. Tannen et al. 2018), the study of technical communication discourse has so far received little attention. This is somewhat surprising in view of our highly technologized society and the increasing importance of communicating effectively about technology in order to bridge the gap between users and (the functionalities of) technical products.
Discourse analysis encompasses a broad range of theories, topics and approaches for explaining language-in-use. In line with Bloor and Bloor (2015), we understand discourse as “symbolic human interaction in its many forms”, whether through spoken or written language or via non-linguistic resources such as image, symbol, sound, and gesture. We welcome contributions that address various discourse aspects in technical communication settings. Contributions may focus on a range of linguistic (grammatical, semantic, pragmatic, stylistic, rhetorical, conversational, narrative, intercultural, critical, cognitive discourse) and non-linguistic phenomena that may be used to examine the relationship between form and function in any technical communication genre across the product life cycle (e.g. instructions for use, technical procedures, warning notices, FAQs, training documents, …). For example, contributions may focus on how language is used to communicate and interact in technical communication contexts or on how semiotic modes such as text, speech, image, symbol, graphics, and sound interact in technical communication outputs. Given that discourse does not only refer to actual ‘text’ but may also incorporate the whole communicative act involving production and comprehension, viz. “peoples’ actions, interactions, values, beliefs, and uses of objects, tools and environments within social or institutional settings” (Gee 2011: 181), contributions may also address matters such as context, background information, conventions, or other shared knowledge between the writer and his (increasingly multicultural or international) audience (Bloor and Bloor 2015), hence widening the scope from micro to macro levels of discourse.

Theme session organizers:
Parthena Charalampidou (Aristotle University of Thessaloniki) and Birgitta Meex (KU Leuven) <birgitta.meex@kuleuven.be>

References:
Bloor, Meriel & Bloor, Thomas (2015). The Practice of Critical Discourse Analysis: An Introduction. London and New York: Routledge.
Gee, James P. (2011). How to do Discourse Analysis: A toolkit. London and New York: Routledge.
Tannen, Deborah, Hamilton, Heidi E. & Schiffrin, Deborah (eds.) (2018). The Handbook of Discourse Analysis. 2nd edition. Hoboken: Wiley-Blackwell.

Call deadline:
If you are interested in participating, please send a provisional title or topic proposal by 8 October. Abstracts of 400 words maximum are due by 15 November 2018, if the theme session is accepted.

The Language of Recruiting: Caught between Persuading and Gatekeeping

03 Jun 2019 – 05 Jun-2019
Leuven, Belgium

Recruitment in professional contexts occurs through many different communicative genres, ranging from job ads (e.g. Verwaeren et al., 2017) over CV’s and cover letters (e.g. Waung et al., 2017) to job interviews (e.g. Timming, 2017) and assessments. Focusing on the perspective of the recruiter, an interesting tension is seen in these genres between the need to persuade well-suited candidates to apply for the vacant position and the need for gatekeeping, viz. the need to prohibit unsuited candidates access to the position and the firm.

Although the job ad can be seen as typically tailored to persuading (see e.g. van Meurs et al. 2015) and job interviews are primarily known for their gatekeeping function (Kerekes 2007), both genres nevertheless portray a notable tension between the two communicative goals. As previous research reveals, this tension can be uncovered through quantitative and qualitative analysis of the language variants and varieties used in these genres. For instance, as van Meurs (2010) and Zenner et al. (2013) discuss, gatekeeping can occur in job ads through the use of English as language of communication, restricting the position to applicants who master the language. Additionally, as e.g. Van de Mieroop & Schnurr (2018) and Roberts & Sarangin (1999) discuss, job interviews are hybrid activity types, where more institutionally oriented discourse types (foregrounding the exchange of information) and more relational discourse types (foregrounding personal information) occur. Both discourse types reveal a tension between gatekeeping (only candidates that fit in both in terms of skills and in terms of personality will be considered) and persuading (candidate’s that actually fit in need to be convinced that the firm is a place they want to work).

Theme session organizers:

Eline Zenner (KU Leuven) and Frank van Meurs (Radboud University Nijmegen)

References:

Kerekes, J. A. 2007. The co-construction of a gatekeeping encounter: An inventory of verbal actions. Journal of Pragmatics 29: 1942-1973.
Roberts, C., Sarangi, S. 1999. Hybridity in gatekeeping discourse: issues of practical relevance for the researcher. In: Sarangi, S., Roberts, C. (Eds.), Talk, Work and Institutional Order: Discourse in Medical, Mediation and Management Settings. Berlin/New York. Mouton de Gruyter, pp. 473–503.
Timming, A. R. 2017. The effect of foreign accent on employability: A study of the aural dimensions of aesthetic labour in customer-facing and non-customer-facing jobs. Work, Employment and Society, 31(3), 409-428.
Van de Mieroop, D. & S. Schnurr. 2018. Candidates’ humour and the construction of co-membership in job interviews. Language & Communication 61, 35-45.
van Meurs, F., H. Korzilius & L. Bergevoet. 2015. English words and phrases in Dutch job advertisements: Do they function as peripheral persuasion cues? Dutch Journal of Applied Linguistics 4(1): 21-38.
van Meurs, F. 2010. English in job advertisements in the Netherlands: Reasons, use and effects. Nijmegen: LOT.
Verwaeren, B., Van Hoye, G., & Baeten, X. 2017. Getting bang for your buck: The specificity of compensation and benefits information in job advertisements. The International Journal of Human Resource Management, 28(19), 2811-2830.
Waung, M., McAuslan, P., DiMambro, J. M., & Mięgoć, N. 2017. Impression management use in resumes and cover letters. Journal of Business and Psychology, 32(6), 727-746.
Zenner, E., D. Speelman & D. Geeraerts. 2013. Macro and micro perspectives on the distribution of English in Dutch: A quantitative usage-based analysis of job ads. Linguistics 51(5): 1019-1064.

Call for Papers:

This theme session aims to contribute to this line of research that studies the mechanisms for persuading and gatekeeping in the language of recruitment. Contributions ideally pay specific attention to the tension between the two communicative goals described above (see  »Session Description »).

Timeline:

– Submission of abstracts (400 words) to theme session organizers by 24 September
– Notification of acceptance from theme session organizers by 30 September
– Submission of theme session proposal by theme session organizers on 30 September
– If the theme session is accepted: submission of individual abstracts by presenters by 15 November

CFP: Vocab@Leuven

The third Vocab@ conference will be hosted by KU Leuven from 1 to 3 July 2019.

Previous Vocab@ conferences were held at Meiji Gakuin University in Tokyo in 2016 and Victoria University Wellington in 2013.

The Vocab@Leuven conference aims to bring together researchers from different disciplines who investigate the learning, processing, teaching, and testing of second/foreign language vocabulary.

Confirmed plenary speakers:

Batia Laufer (University of Haifa)
Marc Brysbaert (Ghent University)

Organizing committee:

Elke Peters
Paul Pauwels
Maribel Montero Perez
Eva Puimège
Ann-Sophie Noreillie
Thao Duong

We will invite abstracts for paper and poster presentations about any topic related to second/foreign language vocabulary:

Strands:

– vocabulary teaching (classroom-based research, technology-based, formal/informal learning, …)
– vocabulary assessment
– vocabulary and the skills of reading, listening, TV viewing, writing and speaking
– formulaic language
– corpus approaches to vocabulary
– psycholinguistic approaches to vocabulary
– neurolinguistic approaches to vocabulary
– vocabulary for specialized use (academic, business, technical, etc.)
– vocabulary resources (word lists, dictionaries, …)
– vocabulary and genre/register

Types of presentations will include:
– individual paper (20 + 10 minutes)
– poster

Submission deadline will be: December 15, 2018

Website : https://vocabatleuven.wordpress.com

10th Discourse, Communication and the Enterprise Conference

03-Jun-2019 – 05-Jun-2019, Leuven, Belgium

The DICOEN conference brings together researchers, practitioners and professionals who are interested in discourse and communication in organizational settings. These settings are broadly defined, self-evidently including prototypical businesses and for-profit organizations, but also non-profit organizations, such as legal, governmental and healthcare settings.

Call for Papers:

Research addressing discourse, communication and the role of language in a wide variety of organizational contexts is typically scattered across a range of disciplines. Remaining within the confines of the various scholarly traditions has two major drawbacks. Firstly, it prevents the cross-fertilization of ideas, and prevents research from gaining full momentum. Secondly, it prevents the scholarly developments and research findings to make their way into teaching and training, whether it concerns communication in the professions, business communication or management curricula. Therefore, DICOEN 10 offers an interdisciplinary forum for all those interested in the language-enterprise interface, bringing together a broad range of academic disciplines (including, but not limited to organizational and management studies, discourse analysis, conversation analysis, pragmatics, cognitive linguistics, forensic linguistics, teacher education, communication studies, social psychology, discursive psychology, anthropology), focusing on discourse and communication in a broad range of profit and non-profit organizations.

General Submission Guidelines:

The submission of proposals opens on 1 September 2018. We welcome the submission of proposals for panels and/or individual presentations.
Deadline call for panel proposals: 1 October 2018
Deadline call for papers: 15 November 2018

Panels:

We invite proposals for panels that address a common theme, method or theoretical topic and that bring together at least 3 individual papers. Panel proposals should be no longer than 800 words and should include:

– An overall description explaining the panel’s theme and objectives;
– A list of potential speakers and, if possible, provisional titles of their presentations.

Abstracts for individual papers in the panel (of up to 400 words each) will have to be submitted separately.

Individual paper presentations:

We invite proposals for individual paper presentations of up to 400 words (including references). All panel contributions have to be submitted as individual paper presentations as well, with an indication of the intended panel in which the paper will be presented. The time allotted to oral presentations will be 20 mins + 10 mins for questions and discussion.

The conference policy is  »one main oral presentation per author ». One may at the same time also be a panel organizer or a co-author of other oral presentations. It is important to note that the first author of each presentation always has to be (co-)presenting and thus has to be registered in order for the presentation to be included in the conference program.

Please see: https://www.arts.kuleuven.be/ling/dicoen2019/call

BCGL11: The syntax and semantics of aspect

Brussels, December 10-11, 2018.

The Center for Research in Syntax, Semantics and Phonology (CRISSP) of KU Leuven invites abstracts for the 11th edition of the Brussels Conference on Generative Linguistics (BCGL 11) devoted to the syntax and semantics of aspect.

Workshop description

The purpose of the conference is to discuss and explore the syntax and semantics of aspect, including the interface between those two, as well as cross-linguistic variation within these domains.

The properties and representations of aspect have been studied extensively from both syntactic and semantic perspectives, as well as their interfaces.

As for the syntax, a central question is how aspectual notions such as telicity, duration, cause and change are represented in syntax. Approaches range from the minimalist structure of Erteschik-shir & Rapoport (2005), to a more fine-grained functional structure as proposed by Ramchand (2008), or with a clear differentiation between outer (external, presentational) and inner (internal, Aktionsart) aspect, as proposed by Travis (2010). More detailed studies of aspect have investigated, for example, the different types of perfect, such as universal, experiental, resultative and existential perfect (e.g. Pancheva 2003). Another relevant question is the distinction between morphological and periphrastic means to express aspectual distinctions. Both the more general and the more detailed studies raise the question of the division of labour between the syntax and the semantics (Ramchand 2008), i.e. on what is contributed by the (extended) syntactic structure of the verb carrying aspectual information, other elements in the syntactic structure, and the lexical semantics of the verb.

The semantics of aspect has also been widely studied. As in the syntax, a distinction is often made between outer and inner aspect, with tense scoping over grammatical (outer) aspect, and grammatical aspect scoping over aspectual class (inner aspect). This layered structure makes it possible to investigate (crosslinguistic variation in) the interaction between the lexical features of the verb, the semantics of the predicate-argument structure, the expression of progressive and perfective/imperfective aspect, and other elements in the sentence which can carry aspectual information (e.g. certain adverbs/adverbial phrases, negation). In this respect, questions arise about the nature of the interaction between perfectivity and telicity, or between tense and aspect (De Swart 2012). A second question concerns the exact setup of the different layers contributing to aspect (cf. Verkuyl 1999; Travis 2000, 2010; Ritter & Rosen 2005; Ramchand 2008). There is also debate about whether grammatical aspect and aspectual class are semantically interpreted by different mechanisms (Smith 1991/1997; Depraetere 1995; Filip 1999; Bertinetto & Delfitto 2000) or by the same ones (Moens & Steedman 1988; Parsons 1990; Kamp & Reyle 1993; De Swart 1998; Verkuyl 1999; Cipria & Roberts 2000). More specific questions to be addressed at the conference include, but are not limited to, the following:

Syntax:

• What are the limits of variation in the expression of aspect? If we assume flexibility in size of and order within the aspectual layer, how much flexibility is there?

• How do languages grammaticalise verbal aspect? What is the range of the variation

observed? Do the present distinctions of grammatical categories suffice?

• Periphrastic constructions are usually included in the category of progressives ‘if they display a medium-to-high degree of grammaticalization and routinization’ (Mair 2012: 804). Can this criterion be grounded in an objective measure of grammaticalisation?

Semantics:

• What kinds of interaction of tense/aspect with non-truth-conditional meaning are possible (e.g., presuppositional imperfective in Russian, cf. Grønn 2004, Borik & Gehrke 2018)?

• How can we formalise anaphoric/referential aspect (Grønn 2004, Grønn & von Stechow 2016, Demirdache & Uribe-Etxebarria 2014)?

• Do the different types of syntactic realisations of aspect have different semantics?

• What kind of semantic mismatches are possible and how can we encode them? (e.g., the present perfect puzzle; Klein 1995)

Syntax-semantics interface:

• What is the division of labour between syntax and semantics, and how much crosslinguistic variation is there with relation to this division of labour?

Invited speakers

• Berit Gehrke (Humboldt Universität, Berlin)

• Roumyana Pancheva (University of Southern California)

• Gillian Ramchand (The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø)

Abstract guidelines

Abstracts should not exceed two pages, including data, references and diagrams. Abstracts should be typed in at least 11-point font, with one-inch margins (letter-size; 8½ inch by 11 inch or A4) and a maximum of 50 lines of text per page. Abstracts must be anonymous and submissions are limited to 2 per author, at least one of which is co-authored. Only electronic submissions will be accepted. Please submit your abstract using the EasyChair link for BCGL11: https://easychair.org/conferences/?conf=bcgl11

Important dates

• First call for papers: June 1, 2018

• Second call for papers: August 16, 2018

• Abstract submission deadline: September 15, 2018

• Notification of acceptance: October 16, 2018

• Conference: December 10-11, 2018

Conference location

CRISSP – KU Leuven Brussels Campus
Stormstraat 2
1000 Brussels
Belgium

Using Corpora in Contrastive and Translation Studies (5th edition)

The Centre for English Corpus Linguistics of the University of Louvain (UCL) is organizing the fifth edition of the Using Corpora in Contrastive and Translation Studies conference series in Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium) on 12-14 September, 2018.

UCCTS is a biennial international conference which was launched by Richard Xiao in 2008 to provide an international forum for the exploration of the theoretical and practical issues pertaining to the creation and use of corpora in contrastive and translation/interpreting studies. The 2018 edition will be dedicated to the memory of Richard, who initiated the conference series but sadly passed away in January 2016.

After almost 30 years of intensive corpus use in contrastive linguistics and translation studies, the conference aims to take stock of the advances that have been made in methodology, theory, analysis and applications, and think up new ways of moving corpus-based contrastive and translation studies forward. UCCTS2018 is meant to bring together researchers who collect, annotate, analyze corpora and/or use them to inform contrastive linguistics and translation theory and/or develop corpus-informed tools (in foreign language teaching, language testing and quality assessment, translation pedagogy, computer-aided/machine translation or other related NLP domains).

Detailed information about the conference (including the list of presentations) can be found on the conference website:https://uclouvain.be/en/research-institutes/ilc/cecl/uccts2018.html

The deadline of abstract submission is extended to  January 22nd.

Keynote speakers

  • Gloria Corpas Pastor (University of Malaga): “In principio erat verbum: A fresh look at corpora for translation and interpreting”
  • Sandra Halverson (Western Norway University of Applied Sciences): “Cognitive translation studies and the combination of data types and methods”
  • Hilde Hasselgård (University of Oslo): “Corpus-based contrastive studies: beginnings, developments and directions”
  • Juliane House (University of Hamburg): “Using corpora for evaluating translations and language change”
  • Haidee Kruger (Macquarie University): “Expanding the third code: Corpus-based studies of constrained communication and language mediation”

Note that participation in the conference is limited by the venue, so we recommend that you register as soon as possible.

Sylviane Granger & Marie-Aude Lefer
UCCTS 2018 Conference Chairs

CMC and Social Media Corpora 2018

17-Sep-2018 – 18-Sep-2018, Antwerp, Belgium

‘CMC-corpora 2018’ is the 6th edition of an annual conference series dedicated to the collection, annotation, processing and exploitation of corpora of computer-mediated communication (CMC) and social media. The conference brings together language-centered research on CMC and social media in linguistics, philologies, communication sciences, media and social sciences with research questions from the fields of corpus and computational linguistics, sociolinguistics, language technology, text technology, and machine learning.

2nd Call for Papers:

We invite submissions for talks and for posters or software/corpus demonstrations on any topic relevant to the list of themes (below). Contributions should be anonymized and submitted via the online conference system, and will be peer-reviewed by the scientific committee. (Visit the online submission link)

For talks, we request short papers (2-4 pages) in English. Authors of accepted papers can present their work at the conference in a 20 minute talk followed by 10 minutes for questions and discussion. Accepted short papers will be published in online proceedings before the conference. After the conference, there will be an open call for extended papers to be published in a special issue of European Journal of Applied Linguistics (EuJAL), to appear in 2019.

For poster presentations (reserved for early stage research) or software/corpus demonstrations, we request abstracts in English (max. 500 words, bibliographical references not included). Authors of accepted abstracts can present their poster and/or give their demonstration during the poster session, which will be opened by one-minute ‘teaser talks’. Accepted abstracts will be printed in the book of abstracts.

All information on the call for papers (deadlines, topics, guidelines) are on the website:
https://www.uantwerpen.be/en/conferences/cmc-social-media-2018/call-for-papers/