IMPACT – 50th ALTE Conference Day

Friday 22 September 2017

Leuven, Belgium

https://alte50.wordpress.com

At a time when unprecedented numbers of people are migrating in the hope of finding a better life, language tests have become a vital component of the migration policy, and the impact of tests on the lives of people is undeniable.

At the 50th ALTE conference day in Leuven, Belgium, renowned researchers from the fields of second language acquisition and language testing will discuss the impact of language tests on society and on the lives of test takers. The focal points are the CEFR, low-educated learners, education, migration, and justice

The conference is organised by ALTE and the CNaVT / Centre for Language and Education (KU Leuven).

Call for papers Translation in Transition 3

TRANSLATION [AND INTERPRETING] IN TRANSITION 3 (GHENT, 13-14 JULY 2017)
After successful editions in Copenhagen in 2014 and Germersheim in 2015, we are pleased to announce that the third Translation in Transition Conference will be held on July 13-14, 2017 at the department of Translation, Interpreting and Communication of Ghent University (Belgium).
The ongoing digitalisation of our world has caused translation to transition from a mostly manual task to a semi- or even fully automated task. Translation research has gone through a comparable transition, with advanced research methods and statistics allowing researchers to study the translation process and product more thoroughly than ever, thereby bridging the gap between related fields as corpus linguistics, computational linguistics, psycholinguistics and bilingualism studies. Within this rapidly evolving field, the traditional dividing line between translation as written text production and interpreting as oral text production has been blurred and there are now numerous areas of research and methodological frameworks that are common to both Translation and Interpreting Studies (TIS). For instance, Translation Studies in recent years has taken an interest in the cognitive processes underlying translation, a field that was previously mainly occupied by interpreting scholars. On the other hand, Interpreting Studies, inspired by developments in translation research, has recently undergone an empirical turn with the compilation of interpreting corpora and a renewed focus on interpreting as a product. Despite these obvious advances in the field, many empirical and theoretical challenges remain: how, for instance, do written translation and interpreting relate to each other, taken both from a product and a process point of view? What are similarities and differences between translation and interpreting, what do these reveal about the nature of these translation modes and how do they inform translation theories? Which theories are available to interpret empirical findings consistently and coherently? How would an empirical theory of translation and interpreting look like? And what about other translation modes, such as audiovisual translation and localisation: how do these relate empirically to written translation and interpreting? Finally, how do technological advances (such as CAT or post-editing) shape the translational product and process? By acknowledging the recent changes in both translation and interpreting research, TT3 takes a step to overcome these challenges.